Category Archives: Conflict esolution

Dorner crisis? How to Resolve Conflict in the LAPD Police?

I was sitting in a house in Point Loma to casually turn on the television to discover that there was a fugitive police officer and ex naval personnel on the run. He apparently had killed a couple (daughter of a LAPD police officer) and had killed another police officer and fled to San Diego. He was reported as seen at Point Loma Naval base.

For myself as a peacemaker the questions going through my mind were to discover what was the core problem. I am still not certain today but the report that was given was that the suspect was a disgrunted ex policeman who resented being dismissed from the Los Angeles police and had a vendetta. I wondered about conflict resolution within the police and what was the core issue. I reflected on the training of this man in the police, training in violence to kill, to ambush and to use his skills to take revenge. They called him a coward for the ambush yet these are techniques trained in the Military and the Police. For me I reflected on training in violence and not conflict resolution. This is not to condone this man’s actions, clearly he was out of control and had no empathy for the people he attacked and murdered, but again coming back to the concept of finding peace one must question their own thoughts for truth to transform conflict. Nearly no-one knows about dealing with thoughts when feeling disgruntled. Moreover, training people to be violent rather than conflict resolovers were the big questions going through my mind. In the end the man appears to have been found shot and burned in a fire. Yet I believe they are still using forensics to discover the truth of the matter.

The media created much fear and the hosts I was staying with were frightened. I was not alarmed and it would not have stopped me walking down the road. I was aware of the car he was driving but didn’t believe he was killing adhoc the public. The media did whip up fear and I sensed there was little in the way of solutions being offered or how to prevent this type of problem emerging in the future. A discussion on what was the nature of the resentment, where did that come from, were there places this ex policeman could go to discuss this problem. He seemed to believe his life was over outside of the force and that he had been wronged. Many innocent people died for that belief. Could he have been trained to deal with his emotions, anger management, how to turnaround negative (see www.thework.com). I am interested in The Work of Byron katie and the concept of ‘who would you be without your story’. Everyone has a story that they convince themselves is true. This man appears to have convinced himself that killing an LAPD officer’s innocent daughter and partner was warranted as revenge, to make this man suffer as he did. How many people have thought like this perhaps not through killing but through payback. Revenge is an insidious emotion and it is about making someone feel your pain rather than dealing with your pain by looking at what really is driving this desperation. Is it lack of self worth? is it not knowing how to approach another police officer and discuss the grievance and resolve it? Are their grievance channels that work? Is it to be seen as a powerful man? I wonder if he was to look deep inside did he carry a belief of not been seen as powerful, as he felt there was nothing he could do to get his job back? Whatever the truth of the matter conflict resolution has to be taught to all people in everyday life whether they be in the police force, military or civilian.

We all believe our thoughts are right and others wrong but imagine what happens if you are prepared to question yourself for the truth as you want peace. My understanding is that peace arises when you question negativity you see the untruth in it. We realise that projection is happening (projecting unowned aspects of ourselves). Here is some information from the Conflict Resolution Network in Sydney.  refer http://www.crnhq.org/pages.php?pID=12#skill_4

6. Managing emotions

Handling yourself

  • 5 Questions + 5 Goals
  • Don’t indulge
  • Don’t deny
  • Create richer relationships

Print out the questionnaire below to complete the following:

Five questions
when angry/hurt/frightened

Why am I feeling so angry/hurt/frightened?

What do I want to change?

What do I need in order to let go of this feeling?

Whose problem is this, really? How much is mine? How much is theirs?

What is the unspoken message I infer from the situation? (e.g. they don’t like me, they don’t respect me.)

Five goals
in communicating emotions

Aim to avoid the desire to punish or blame. Action?

Aim to improve the situation. Action?

Aim to communicate your feelings appropriately. Action?

Aim to improve the relationship and increase communication. Action?

Aim to avoid repeating the same situation. Action?

If communication is not appropriate, what other action can I take?

Managing emotions – part 2

Handling others

People’s behaviour occurs for a purpose. They are looking for ways to belong, feel significant, and self-protect. When people perceive a threat for their self-esteem, a downward spiral can begin. People can be led into obstructive behaviours in the faulty belief that this will gain them a place of belonging and significance. How we respond to their difficult behaviours can determine how entrenched these become.

The secret is to break out of the spiral by supporting their real needs without supporting their destructive faulty beliefs, and alienating patterns of reaction.

Difficult Behaviour(and the Faulty Belief Behind It) The Downward Spiral Better Alternatives
Seeking Attention (“I only belong when I am being noticed.”), You feel annoyed and react by coaxing. They stop briefly, and then resume behaviour and demands,, perhaps in a new way. Avoid undue attention. Give attention for positive behaviour especially when they are not making a bid for it. Support their real contribution and involvement.
Power Plays(“I only belong when I am in control, when no-one can boss me!”). You feel provoked or threatened and react by fighting or giving in. Their aggression is intensified or they comply defiantly. Disengage from the struggle. Help them to use power constructively by enlisting co-operation. Support their self-worth and autonomy.
Seeking Revenge (“I am significant only if I make others feel hurt like I do.”) You feel hurt by them, and retaliate. They seek further revenge more strongly or with another weapon. Convince them that you respect their needs. Build trusting relationships. Support their need for justice and fairness.
Appear Inadequate (“I won’t be hurt any more, only if I can convince others not to expect much from me.”) You give up, overwhelmed. They respond passively, show no improvement, and stay “victim”. Encourage any positive attempt, no matter how small. Focus on assets. Provide bite-sized learning experiences they can succeed at. Support how they feel as a starting place for self-improvement.

7. Willingness to resolve

Projection and shadow

Does the situation inform or inflame?

The Opportunity

The more someone inflames me, angers or upsets me, the more I know I have something to learn about myself from that person. In particular, I need to see where projection from my shadow side has interfered with my willingness to resolve.

Projection

Projection is when we see our own thoughts and feelings in the minds and behaviour of others and not in ourselves. We push something about ourselves out of our awareness and instead see it coming towards us from others. We see that X is angry with us and we feel hurt. We don’t recognise that we are angry with X and would like to hurt X. It’s very similar to film projection. The movie going on in our heads is projected out onto the people around us. Each of us builds, in this way, a highly personalised world. Greater self- awareness is necessary if we are to see reality.

Persona and shadow

Psychologist, Carl Jung, used the word “Persona” to describe the conscious aspects of personality, good and bad aspects which are known to the person. Jung called the unknown side of who we are “shadow”.

Persona: My self-image. Things I accept are true about myself. My conscious desires, wants, feelings, intentions and beliefs. Shadow: Potential I have not unfolded. Aspects of myself I’m not ready to know about. My unconscious wants and dislikes. Emotional responses that are too painful to fully experience. Abilities/ talents I’m not ready to accept or express.

 

It is very powerful and we all fall into this trap when we do not question ourselves. We all do it and we demonise others very easily truly believing they are this or that.

I don’t think psychological understanding or conflict resolution will be a discussion in the media, the military or the police. I hope perhaps one day we start to really look at ourselves for truth on all sides, as all contribute to the problem by not deeply looking at the core problem. When we have compassion for all human’s even the bad ones, a new window of understanding opens up as we start to see what drives the darker side of human nature. However, if we want to create safe communities then we have to look at human emotions, frustration, suppression, violence and how to deal with problems and resolve conflict. When we do that we all take responsibility for the world we all create together. A world that seeks to help all sides and to ensure it doesn’t happen again or at least learn how to heal the pain and provide peaceful pathways we will start to move along a pathway that is in all our interests. That is my vision of the future. Violence has to be seen as a weakness and a cry for help, it can no longer be seen as powerful, if we keep this myth alive the next generation of children will think this is how we solve problems. Justice and values have to come into the discussion. We have to learn how to deal with inner and outer conflict and find solutions collectively, as we are all affected.

Here is an overview of what has been deemed the biggest manhunt. I wonder could this have been avoided? What is the cost of not resolving conlict? Imagine if we were able to invest the funds into peace education or conflict resolution programs could we produce with these resources. How many tragedies could be prevented?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/12/chris-dorner-manhunt_n_2672238.html

Chris Dorner Shootout: Fugitive Ex-Cop Exchanges Fire With Police, AP Reports (LIVE UPDATES, VIDEO)

AP  |  By GILLIAN FLACCUS AND TAMI ABDOLLAH Posted: 02/12/2013 4:26 pm EST  |  Updated: 02/13/2013 4:53 pm EST

 
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BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. — The extraordinary manhunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of three murders converged Tuesday on a mountain cabin where authorities believe he barricaded himself inside, engaged in a shootout that killed a deputy and then never emerged as the home went up in flames.

A single gunshot was heard from within, and a charred body was found inside.

If the man inside proves to be Christopher Dorner, as authorities suspect, the search for the most wanted man in America over the last week would have ended the way he had expected – death, with the police pursuing him.

Thousands of officers had been on the hunt for the former Navy reservist since police said he launched a campaign to exact revenge against the Los Angeles Police Department for his firing. They say he threatened to bring “warfare” to officers and their families, spreading fear and setting off a search for him across the Southwest and Mexico.

CLICK HERE FOR LIVE UPDATES

“Enough is enough. It’s time for you to turn yourself in. It’s time to stop the bloodshed,” LAPD Cmdr. Andrew Smith said at a news conference held outside police headquarters in Los Angeles, a starkly different atmosphere than last week when officials briefed the news media under tight security with Dorner on the loose.

A short time after Smith spoke Tuesday, smoke began to rise from the cabin in the snow-covered woods near Big Bear Lake, a resort town about 80 miles east of Los Angeles. Flames then engulfed the building – images that were broadcast on live television around the world. TV helicopters showed the fire burning freely with no apparent effort to extinguish it.

“We have reason to believe that it is him,” said San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Cynthia Bachman, adding that she didn’t know how the fire started. She noted there was gunfire between the person in the cabin and officers around the home before the blaze began.

Until Tuesday, authorities didn’t know whether Dorner was still near Big Bear Lake, where they found his burned-out pickup last week.

Around 12:20 p.m. Tuesday, deputies got a report of a stolen pickup truck, authorities said. The location was directly across the street from where law enforcement set up their command post on Thursday and not far from where Dorner’s pickup was abandoned. The owner of the vehicle taken Tuesday described the suspect as looking similar to Dorner.

A warden for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife traveling down Highway 38 recognized a man who fit Dorner’s description traveling in the opposite direction. The officer pursued the vehicle and there was a shooting at 12:42 p.m. in which the wildlife vehicle was hit numerous times and the suspect escaped on foot after crashing his truck.

After holing up in the cabin, there was a second gunbattle with San Bernardino County deputies, two of whom were shot. One died and the other was expected to live after undergoing surgery.

“We’re heartbroken,” Big Bear Lake Mayor Jay Obernolte said of the deputy’s death and the wounding of his colleague. “Words can’t express how grateful we are for the sacrifice those men have made in defense of the community and our thoughts and prayers are with them and their families.”

The man believed to be Dorner never came out of the cabin, and a single shot was heard inside before the cabin was engulfed in flames, a law enforcement official told The Associated Press.

The official later told the AP that a charred body was found in the burned cabin. The official requested anonymity because of the ongoing investigation.

Officials were waiting for the fire to burn out before approaching the ruins to search for a body.

A SWAT team earlier had surrounded the cabin and using an armored vehicle, broke out the cabin windows, the official said. The officers then pumped gas into the cabin and blasted a message over a loudspeaker: “Surrender or come out.”

The armored vehicle then tore down each of the cabin’s four walls, like peeling back the layers of an onion, the official said.

Police say Dorner began his run on Feb. 6 after they connected the slayings of a former police captain’s daughter and her fiance with an angry Facebook rant they said he posted. Threats against the LAPD led officials to assign officers to protect officers and their families.

Within hours of the release of photos of the 6-foot, 270-pounder described as armed and “extremely dangerous,” police say, Dorner unsuccessfully tried to steal a boat in San Diego to flee to Mexico and opened fire on two patrol cars in Riverside County, shooting three officers and killing one.

Jumpy officers guarding one of the targets named in the rant shot and injured two women delivering newspapers Thursday in Torrance because they mistook their pickup truck for Dorner’s.

Police found weapons and camping gear inside the charred truck in Big Bear. Helicopters using heat-seeking technology searched the forest from above while scores of officers, some using bloodhounds, scoured the ground and checked hundreds of vacation cabins – many vacant this time of year – in the area.

A snowstorm hindered the search and may have helped cover his tracks, though authorities were hopeful he would leave fresh footprints if hiding in the wilderness.

Dorner’s anger with the department dated back at least five years, when he was fired for filing a false report accusing his training officer of kicking a mentally ill suspect. Dorner, who is black, claimed in the rant that he was the subject of racism by the department and fired for doing the right thing.

He said he would get even with those who wronged him as part of his plan to reclaim his good name.

“You’re going to see what a whistleblower can do when you take everything from him especially his NAME!!!” the rant said. “You have awoken a sleeping giant.”

Chief Charlie Beck, who initially dismissed the allegations in the rant, said reopened the investigation into his firing – not to appease the ex-officer, but to restore confidence in the black community, which long had a fractured relationship with police that has improved in recent years.

One of the targets listed in the manifesto was former LAPD Capt. Randal Quan, who represented Dorner before the disciplinary board. Dorner claimed he put the interests of the department above his.

The first victims were Quan’s daughter, Monica Quan, 28, a college basketball coach, and her fiance, Keith Lawrence, 27. They were shot multiple times in their car in a parking garage near their Orange County condo.

Dorner served in the Navy, earning a rifle marksman ribbon and pistol expert medal. He was assigned to a naval undersea warfare unit and various aviation training units, according to military records. He took leave from the LAPD for a six-month deployment to Bahrain in 2006 and 2007.

He left the service on Feb. 1.

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  • In this image taken from video provided by KABC-TV, the cabin in Big Bear, Calif. where ex-Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner is believed to be barricaded inside is in flames Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/KABC-TV) MANDATORY CREDIT: KABC-TV

  • In this image taken from video provided by KABC-TV, the cabin in Big Bear, Calif. where ex-Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner is believed to be barricaded inside is in flames Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/KABC-TV) MANDATORY CREDIT: KABC-TV

  • Bill Whalen, Andrew Smith, Norma Eisenman

    Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith, second from left, expresses condolences for the death of a San Bernardino County deputy, as he briefs the media about the shootout scene in Big Bear that allegedly involves triple-murder suspect Christopher Jordan Dorner, during a late news conference in front of the Police Administration Building in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. Lt. Bill Whalen, of the Irvine Police Department, far left, and LAPD Officer Norma Eisenman, right, stand with Smith. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

  • Andrew Smith, Bill Whalen, Norma Eisenman

    Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith, left, expresses condolences for the death of a San Bernardino County deputy, as he briefs the media about the shootout scene in Big Bear that allegedly involves triple-murder suspect Christopher Jordan Dorner, during a late news conference in front of the Police Administration Building in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. Lt. Bill Whalen, of the Irvine Police Department, middle and LAPD officer Norma Eisenman, right, stand with Smith. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

  • Cindy Bachman, public information officer for the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, talks about the hunt for accused killer and fired Los Angeles police Officer Christopher Dorner in Angelus Oaks, Caif., Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

  • A Redlands Police officer walks near a road blockade near the entrance to the San Bernardino National Forest in southern California after Christopher Dorner, a fugitive ex-Los Angeles cop sought in three killings, engaged in a shootout with authorities that wounded two officers in the San Bernardino Mountains near Big Bear Lake, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/The Sun, Gabriel Luis Acosta) VENTURA COUNTY STAR OUT; RIVERSIDE PRESS-ENTERPRISE OUT; THE VICTOR VALLEY DAILY PRESS OUT

  • Manhunt For Former L.A. Cop Leads Back To Big Bear Lake

    YUCAIPA, CA – FEBRUARY 12: Redlands police officers secure at a blockade during a manhunt for the former Los Angeles Police Department officer Christopher Dorner who is suspected of triple murder on February 12, 2013 in Yucaipa, California. Dorner barricaded himself in a cabin near Big Bear, California and is in a standoff with authorities after shooting two police officers, killing one and wounding the other. Dorner, a former Los Angeles Police Department officer and Navy Reserve veteran, is wanted in connection with the deaths of an Irvine couple and a Riverside police officer. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

  • US-CRIME-POLICE-INCIDENT

    Shantel Cardiel (L) and Frank Cardiel hold up signs in support of fugitive triple murder suspect Christopher Dorner along the road in San Bernardino, California n February 12, 2013. Fugitive former US cop Christopher Dorner exchanged gunfire with police near a Californian ski resort where his burnt-out truck was found, reports said. The 33-year-old was involved in the shooting after he tried to burglarize a home near Big Bear, two hours east of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Times reported, citing a law enforcement source.   AFP PHOTO / David McNew (Photo credit should read DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-CRIME-POLICE-INCIDENT

    Shantel Cardiel holds up a sign in support of fugitive triple murder suspect Christopher Dorner along the road in San Bernardino, California n February 12, 2013. Fugitive former US cop Christopher Dorner exchanged gunfire with police near a Californian ski resort where his burnt-out truck was found, reports said. The 33-year-old was involved in the shooting after he tried to burglarize a home near Big Bear, two hours east of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Times reported, citing a law enforcement source.   AFP PHOTO / David McNew (Photo credit should read DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Manhunt For Former L.A. Cop Leads Back To Big Bear Lake

    ANGELUS OAKS, CA – FEBRUARY 12: A San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department deputy watches as a car is towed away after a standoff and a shootout with former Los Angeles Police Department officer Christopher Dorner who is suspected of triple murder on February 12, 2013 in Angelus Oaks, California. Dorner barricaded himself in a cabin near Big Bear, California which later caught fire. According to the LAPD the cabin remains too hot to enter and a body has not been located. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

  • Law Enforcement personnel gear up along Hwy 38 during the hunt for accused killer and fired Los Angeles police officer, Christopher Dorner in Yacaipa, Caif.,Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. Dorner, a man police believe to be the fugitive ex-Los Angeles officer wanted in three killings, was barricaded inside a burning cabin Tuesday after a shootout in a California mountain town that left one deputy dead and another wounded. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

  • Andrew Smith

    Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith, left, briefs the media about the shootout scene in Big Bear that allegedly involves triple-murder suspect Christopher Jordan Dorner, during a news conference in front of the Police Administration Building in Los Angeles Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

  • A Redlands Police officer inspects a vehicle near the entrance to the San Bernardino National Forest, Calif. after fugitive ex-Los Angeles cop Christopher Dorner, sought in three killings, is believed to have engaged in a shootout with authorities that wounded two officers in the San Bernardino Mountains near Big Bear Lake, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/The Sun, Gabriel Luis Acosta) LA TIMES; VENTURA COUNTY STAR; RIVERSIDE PRESSENTERPRISE; THE VICTOR VALLEY DAILY PRESS OUT MANDATORY CREDIT

  • Law Enforcement personnel block Hwy 38 during the hunt for accused killer and ex-Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner in Yacaipa, Caif., Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. Dorner is believed to be barricaded in a cabin Tuesday after a furious gunbattle with police in the snow-covered mountains of Southern California, authorities said, the culmination of an intensive manhunt that left a region an edge for nearly a week. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

  • Law Enforcement personnel search a vehicle along Hwy 38 during the hunt for accused killer and ex-Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner in Yacaipa, Caif., Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. Dorner is believed to be barricaded in a cabin Tuesday after a furious gunbattle with police in the snow-covered mountains of Southern California, authorities said, the culmination of an intensive manhunt that left a region an edge for nearly a week. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

  • Bill Whalen, Andrew Smith

    Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith, right, briefs the media about the shootout scene in Big Bear that allegedly involves triple-murder suspect Christopher Jordan Dorner, during a news conference in front of the Police Administration Building in Los Angeles Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. At left, Lt. Bill Whalen of the Irvine Police Department.

  • A Redlands Police officer walks near a road blockade near the entrance to the San Bernardino National Forest in southern California near Big Bear Lake, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013.

  • Redlands Police officers man a blockade near the entrance to the San Bernardino National Forest in southern California after Christopher Dorner engaged in a shootout with authorities that wounded two officers in the San Bernardino Mountains near Big Bear Lake, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013.

  • Members on the California Highway Patrol search a truck for Christopher Dorner on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Big Bear Lake, Calif.

  • A San Bernardino County Sheriff SWAT team returns to the command post at Bear Mountain near Big Bear Lake, Calif. after searching for Christopher Jordan Dorner on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Search conditions have been hampered by a heavy winter storm in the area. Dorner, a former Los Angeles police officer, is accused of carrying out a killing spree because he felt he was unfairly fired from his job. (AP Photo/Pool, The Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Will Lester)

  • A police vehicle patrols the streets of Big Bear Lake, Calif., Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. Clear skies allowed aircraft with heat-sensing technology to aid scores of officers searching in the snow-covered San Bernardino Mountains for Christopher Dorner, the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of killing three people in a vengeance-fueled rampage aimed at those he blames for ending his career. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

  • Bernabe Ortiz

    San Bernardino County Sheriff’s officer Bernabe Ortiz holds a pistol as he searches a home for former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner in Big Bear Lake, Calif, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. The hunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected in three killings entered a fourth day in snow-covered mountains Sunday, a day after the police chief ordered a review of the disciplinary case that led to the fugitive’s firing and new details emerged of the evidence he left behind. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

  • Bernabe Ortiz, Ken Owens

    San Bernardino County Sheriff’s officers Ken Owens, center, and Bernabe Ortiz search a home for former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner in Big Bear Lake, Calif, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. The hunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected in three killings entered a fourth day in snow-covered mountains Sunday, a day after the police chief ordered a review of the disciplinary case that led to the fugitive’s firing and new details emerged of the evidence he left behind. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

  • Bernabe Ortiz, Ken Owens

    San Bernardino County Sheriff’s officer Ken Owens searches a home for the former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner in Big Bear Lake, Calif, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. The hunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected in three killings entered its fourth day in the snow-covered mountains on Sunday, a day after the police chief ordered a review of the disciplinary case that led to the fugitive’s firing and new details emerged of the evidence he left behind. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

  • California Highway Patrol officers search a truck for former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner at a checkpoint near Big Bear Lake, Calif, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Law enforcement officers working in falling snow searched the Southern California mountain for Dorner, who is accused of carrying out a killing spree because he felt he was unfairly fired from his job. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

  • A San Bernardino County Sheriff SWAT team returns to the command post at Bear Mountain near Big Bear Lake, Calif.

  • A San Bernardino County Sheriff SWAT team returns to the command post at Bear Mountain near Big Bear Lake, Calif. after searching for Christopher Jordan Dorner on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Search conditions have been hampered by a heavy winter storm in the area.

  • U.S. Forest Service Law Enforcement vehicles are covered in snow near the command post in Big Bear Lake, Calif, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013.

  • U.S. Marshals deputies look behind the vegetation as they stand on guard outside the home of the mother of fugitive suspect Christopher Dorner on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013.

  • Christopher Dorner

    This image shows Christopher Dorner from Jan. 28, 2013 surveillance video at an Orange County, Calif., hotel.

  • A digital billboard along Santa Monica Boulevard on the west side of Los Angeles shows a “wanted” alert on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013.

  • California Highway Patrol officers search a vehicle for former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner at a checkpoint near Big Bear Lake, Calif, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013.

  • A California Highway Patrol officer tells a driver to roll the window at a checkpoint near Big Bear Lake, Calif, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013.

  • San Bernardino County Sheriff’s deputies gather at the command post in Big Bear Lake, Calif, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. Clear skies allowed aircraft with heat-sensing technology to aid scores of officers searching in the snow-covered San Bernardino Mountains for Christopher Dorner, the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of killing three people in a vengeance-fueled rampage aimed at those he blames for ending his career. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

  • San Bernardino County Sheriff’s deputies board a snow cat at the command post in Big Bear Lake, Calif., Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013.

  • A San Bernardino County Sheriff’s helicopter flies over Big Bear Lake, Calif., Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013.

  • A U.S. Forest Service Law Enforcement officer follows tracks left in the snow while searching a home for former Christopher Dorner in Big Bear Lake, Calif, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. Clear skies allowed aircraft with heat-sensing technology to aid scores of officers searching in the snow-covered San Bernardino Mountains.

  • San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department officer Steven Spagon mans a check point during the search in Big Bear Lake, Calif. Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Law enforcement officials spent all night searching the snowy mountains of Southern California.

  • Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies stand alert outside the Twin Towers jail, which was put on lockdown after an alleged sighting of suspect Christopher Jordan Dorner Friday Feb. 8, 2013 in Los Angeles. The lockdown was later lifted. Law enforcement officers worked through the night amid an incoming snow storm searching for the former Los Angeles police officer accused of carrying out a killing spree because he felt he was unfairly fired from his job.

  • Cindy Bachman

    Cindy Bachman, public information officer for the San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department, updates the media on the search for fired Los Angeles police officer, Christopher Dorner.

  • Christopher Dorner

    This undated series of photos shows suspect Christopher Dorner. Dorner, who was fired from the LAPD in 2008 for making false statements, is linked to a weekend killing in which one of the victims was the daughter of a former police captain who had represented him during the disciplinary hearing.

  • Christopher Dorner

    This undated photo released by the Los Angeles Police Department shows suspect Christopher Dorner, a former Los Angeles officer. Dorner, who was fired from the LAPD in 2008 for making false statements, is linked to a weekend killing in which one of the victims was the daughter of a former police captain who had represented him during the disciplinary hearing. Authorities believe Dorner opened fire early Thursday on police in cities east of Los Angeles, killing an officer and wounding another. Police issued a statewide “officer safety warning” and police were sent to protect people named in the posting that was believed to be written by Dorner. (AP Photo/Los Angeles Police Department)

  • Christopher Dorner

    This undated photo shows suspect Christopher Dorner. (AP Photo/Los Angeles Police Department)

  • Christopher Dorner

    This undated photo shows suspect Christopher Dorner. Police issued a statewide “officer safety warning” and police were sent to protect people named in the posting that was believed to be written by Dorner.

  • Here, former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Jordan Dorner is shown. Dorner is a suspect in the killings of Monica Quan and her fiance, Keith Lawrence.

  • Charlie Beck, Sandy Jo MacArthur

    Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck, right, comments on fired officer, Christopher Dorner, Dorner’s multiple weapons, including an assault rifle, during a news conference at the LAPD headquarters in Los Angeles Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013.

  • Sara Faden, Christopher Dorner, Norma Eisenman

    Los Angeles Police Public Information officers: Sara Faden, left, and Officer Norma Eisenman carry photos of suspect Christopher Dorner during a news conference at the LAPD headquarters in Los Angeles Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013. At left, Assistant Chief Sandy Jo MacArthur.

  • Corona, Calif., Police officers stand near the site of a police shooting Thursday Feb. 7, 2013 in Corona, Calif.

  • A burned-out pickup truck belonging to ex-Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner is towed after it was discovered in Big Bear, Calif, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013.

  • A bullet-damaged Los Angeles Police vehicle is taped off by police on Thursday Feb. 7, 2013 in Corona, Calif.

  • A Los Angeles Police officer checks his weapon at the site of a shooting Thursday Feb. 7, 2013 in Corona, Calif.

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1:09 AM – 02/13/2013

Timeline Of Dorner Manhunt

The Associated Press has created a timeline of key events in the ongoing manhunt for Christopher Dorner, the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of killing at least three people. Note: All times approximate:

Sunday, Feb. 3: An assistant women’s college basketball coach and her fiance are found shot to death in their car in Irvine, Calif. Police learn later the woman was the daughter of a retired Los Angeles police captain who represented Dorner in disciplinary hearings that resulted in his dismissal from the force.

Monday, Feb. 4: Some of Dorner’s belongings, including police equipment, are found in a trash bin in suburban San Diego, linking him to Irvine killings.

Wednesday, Feb. 6: Police announce finding Dorner’s manifesto online.

10:30 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 6: A man matching Dorner’s description makes a failed attempt to steal a boat from a San Diego marina. An 81-year-old man on the vessel is tied up but otherwise unharmed.

1:30 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: LAPD officers, protecting a person named in the manifesto, chase a vehicle they believe is Dorner’s. One officer is grazed in the forehead by a bullet during a shootout, and the gunman flees.

A short time later, a shooter believed to be Dorner ambushes two Riverside police officers during a routine patrol. One officer is killed, and the other critically injured.

2:20 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: A shuttle bus driver turns in a wallet with an LAPD badge and a picture ID of Dorner to San Diego police. The wallet was found fewer than five miles from the boat, near San Diego International Airport.

5 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: LAPD officers guarding a manifesto target in the Los Angeles suburb of Torrance open fire on a truck they mistakenly believe to be Dorner’s. A mother and daughter delivering the newspaper are injured.

A short time later, Torrance police are involved in a second shooting involving a different truck they also mistake for Dorner’s. Nobody is hurt.

8:35 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: Police find a burned-out pickup truck near the Big Bear ski area in the San Bernardino Mountains. Six hours later, authorities identify it as Dorner’s.

9:40 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego is locked down after a Navy worker reports seeing someone who resembles Dorner. Military officials later said Dorner had indeed checked into a hotel on base earlier in the week – on Tuesday – but had left on Wednesday.

4 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: Authorities search a Las Vegas-area home belonging to Dorner and leave with several boxes of items. They say no weapons were found but decline to disclose what was discovered.

Friday, Feb. 8: Dozens of searchers hunt for Dorner in the freezing, snowy San Bernardino Mountains after losing his footprints near the site where the truck was found. Authorities search Dorner’s mother’s house in La Palma and collect 10 bags of evidence and also take five electronic items for examination. Police also search a storage locker in Buena Park.

Saturday, Feb. 9: Helicopters equipped with heat-seeking technology resume search for Dorner in the mountains near Big Bear. Authorities reveal that weapons and camping gear were found in Dorner’s burned truck.

Sunday, Feb. 10: Authorities announce $1 million reward for information leading to Dorner’s arrest.

Monday, Feb. 11: Riverside County prosecutors charge Dorner with murdering a police officer and the attempted murder of three other officers in a potential death penalty case. Authorities receive more than 700 tips since the reward was announced.

12:20 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: Police are summoned after a man resembling Dorner steals a purple Nissan in the San Bernardino Mountains. The vehicle is quickly spotted by California Department of Fish and Wildlife wardens on Highway 38. After briefly losing the suspect, the wardens see a white pickup truck driving toward them erratically and at a high rate of speed. Wardens say Dorner rolled down his window and opened fire as he drove past them in the opposite directions.

One of the wardens was able to get out and fire at the driver, who escaped on foot after crashing his truck.

12:40 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: State Fish and Wildlife wardens are involved in a shootout with the suspect. Two San Bernardino County sheriff’s deputies are wounded in a second exchange of gunfire and are transported to Loma Linda Medical Center.

4:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: Police surround the cabin where the suspect is holed up and gunfire erupts before a blaze engulfs the structure and law enforcement officers wait for the fire to burn out.

4:50 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: A San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman confirms one of the two wounded deputies has died, and the other is in surgery and expected to survive.

6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: A law enforcement officials tells the AP a charred body has been found in the rubble of the burned cabin. They don’t confirm the identity, although authorities earlier said they believed the man in the cabin was Dorner.

12:35 AM – 02/13/2013

Police: Charred Remains Found In Cabin

AP @ AP : BREAKING: Sheriff’s spokeswoman says charred human remains found in rubble of burned cabin in California http://t.co/X1ezLJEq