Category Archives: Data gathering

Ex CIA Exposes the Criminal Cartel in Washington D.C. as the Biggest Scandal in US History

In the public interest. Do you see our world as out of control? This video below will explain why.

Kevin Shipp, a former CIA officer discusses the Shadow Government and the Deep State. He outlines Hillary Clinton’s illegal activities calling Criminal Cabal. He indicates this is the biggest scandal in US history.

The key issue raised is accountability. He is astounded that given clear felony’s by senior figures in Washington D.C., nothing happens.

This was a question I had. I couldn’t understand if there is criminal activity why is there no criminal case and jail terms? Kevin Shipp explains the protection of corruption in Washington. It is well organised.

An Australian is mentioned, former Minister for Foreign Affairs, Alexander Downer was mentioned as involved. Kevin Shipp states:

Alexander Downer, Australian Ambassador to the US gave $24 million tax dollars to Clinton foundation. Australian people do not know. He pops up in a bar approaching George George Papadopoulos to get him to admit the Trump campaign had Hillary Clinton’s emails…

This video presentation is very alarming given the power of US politics and implications for World Peace if out of control with no checks and balances. Their influence on other countries, including Australia, impacts political decisions, budget’s, military spending, welfare, trade deals and other illegal activities. It sets a standard for covering up illegal activity and the use of secrecy clearances to block government oversight on their activities. It is a complex and informative discussion.

He speaks about the critical importance of President Donald Trump’s Presidency cannot be underestimated in blocking the domination agenda called the New International World Order (New World Order). He is an outsider, he uses his own money and he is attempting to expose their activities and is under attack himself to remove him before the next election. Donald Trump uses the term ‘draining the swamp’ which describes a long term pattern of corruption in the Whitehouse, Federal Government and intelligence community.

The mindsets are anti-democratic, unconstitutional, illegal and engaging in activities that are hidden from the public. Kevin Shipp is bringing this out in the open so the public are informed about what is being done in their name. He holds grave concerns about US Democracy and criminality at the highest levels.

Julian Assange Awakens Secrecy as Repugnant to Freedom

This is an article from the Australian ABC regarding Julian Assange, lawyers, breach of privacy and surveillance.  the article focuses on the recording of Geoffrey Robertson QC a famous Australian barrister, well known by those of us over 40 for the ABC program ‘Hypothetical’.  Geoffrey Robertson demonstrated justice as he challenged influential Australians to respond to controversial issues, scenarios indicating how they would handle a difficult problem. He demonstrated Justice and Inquiry. 

He is a human rights lawyer and his lawyer-client privilege was breached due to powerful interests not driven by Justice but power. 

I felt inspired to give J F Kennedy a voice in this blog which drives to the heart of this problem.  

Transcript: https://www.jfklibrary.org/archives/other-resources/john-f-kennedy-speeches/american-newspaper-publishers-association-19610427

The keystone message of Kennedy is as follows:

I not only could not stifle controversy among your readers–I welcome it. This Administration intends to be candid about its errors; for as a wise man once said: “An error does not become a mistake until you refuse to correct it.” We intend to accept full responsibility for our errors; and we expect you to point them out when we miss them.

Without debate, without criticism, no Administration and no country can succeed–and no republic can survive. That is why the Athenian lawmaker Solon decreed it a crime for any citizen to shrink from controversy. And that is why our press was protected by the First Amendment– the only business in America specifically protected by the Constitution- -not primarily to amuse and entertain, not to emphasize the trivial and the sentimental, not to simply “give the public what it wants”–but to inform, to arouse, to reflect, to state our dangers and our opportunities, to indicate our crises and our choices, to lead, mold, educate and sometimes even anger public opinion.

The important question for US lawmakers and politicians is – Can you face high crimes and misdemeanours and correct mistakes rather than criminalise the messenger?   Wikipedia provides insight into the meaning:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_crimes_and_misdemeanors

When you deeply contemplate the journey of Julian Assange you realise he is a light on the hill as he reminds the US of its true purpose as they have lost their way.  He is a beacon who not only revealed US secrets but awakened the world to what is called the ‘dark side’ of surveillance and political corruption. Justice is not a business deal it is about the truth that sets all free.

Recently I wondered about him. I sent light and protection to him and that he is safe as the US seek to jail him for revealing what is on ‘a need to know basis’. 

When you have experienced inequality before the law, illegal surveillance, privacy breaches and corruption your Cinderella world view dissolves as you become dis-illusioned.  That is, the illusion falls from your eyes and you see clearly. 2020 (vision) is about clear seeing. Until you walk in Julian’s shoes you cannot know the sacrifice he made in the public interest, albeit global interest. We are learning about how power operates as distinct to Justice. The lengths people will go to, to win and pervert the course of  justice. The lack of ethics, integrity and manipulation of the rule of law is under the spotlight. 

It is noteworthy that those persons exposed of crimes and/or breaches to the Constitution are not arrested but the whistle-blowers are pursued as if criminals and rights to Justice undermined. The Brave New World is a teacher, we are being given glimpses into this possible future and every person is choosing. This is the real universal vote. Complacency or democracy?

The surveillance state is increasingly being privatised as contractors are paid by national intelligence agencies accessing secrets themselves.  Secrets (security) are leverage.  Imagine how wide spread is espionage as intelligence becomes private security (business) becomes intelligence in the revolving door of greed where there is always a back door to breach privacy and make money from vulnerability.  Greed is the key issue arising out of a desire to live like the US, yet, must we rob Peter to pay Paul. Debt is another leverage point.

Some key quotes from the ABC article below are worthy of contemplation.

“It’s important that clients can speak frankly and freely in a confidential space with their lawyers in order to be able to protect themselves and ensure that they have the best possible legal strategy and that the other side does not have advance notice of it,” Robinson said.

Referring to a Spanish allegation that the US Government had advance notice of legal conversations in the embassy, she said: “That is … a huge and a serious breach of [Assange’s] right to a defence and a serious breach of his fair trial rights”.

“I wasn’t surprised at all. It’s an occupational hazard for human rights lawyers. You’re bugged, you’re followed by secret police, you’re spied upon,” said Robertson, one of Australia and the UK’s most respected human rights barristers for almost 50 years.

The extradition hearing comes amid a flurry of activity related to Assange: on Friday his legal team also confirmed they will try to seek asylum for the WikiLeaks boss in France, and on Thursday an English court heard that Assange was offered a US presidential pardon if he agreed to say that Russia was not involved in a 2016 leak of Democratic Party emails.

When the ABC asked questions of the US embassy in Canberra, it referred questions to the US justice department, which did not respond by deadline.

The ABC also sent questions to the CIA and the US Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Neither responded by deadline.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/julian-assange-and-his-australian-lawyers-were-secretly-recorded-in-ecuadors-london-embassy/ar-BB10hrG3?ocid=spartandhp

Julian Assange and his Australian lawyers were secretly recorded in Ecuador’s London embassy

Dylan Welch, Suzanne Dredge and Clare Blumer 2 hrs ago

WikiLeaks' founder Julian Assange leaves Westminster Magistrates Court in London, Britain January 13, 2020.

© REUTERS/Henry Nicholls WikiLeaks’ founder Julian Assange leaves Westminster Magistrates Court in London, Britain January 13, 2020. Barrister Geoffrey Robertson’s shuffles into the entrance to Ecuador’s embassy in London, a camera recording the sound of his shoes echoing on the hard tiles.

It’s just after 7:00pm on January 12, 2018.

The camera rolls as Robertson stops at the front door, unbuttons his overcoat and removes his cap.

Once inside the embassy, other cameras follow him as he’s ushered into a meeting room, where the storied Queen’s Counsel is offered a cup of tea.

After a few minutes, he is greeted by the embassy’s most famous resident, Julian Assange.

The camera continues to roll, recording every word of the confidential legal conversation which follows.

While this may be typical surveillance at a secure diplomatic property, what Robertson did not know was he and a handful of other lawyers, were allegedly being targeted in a remarkable and deeply illegal surveillance operation possibly run at the request of the US Government.

Pictures: The case of Julian Assange (Showbizz Daily)

And recordings such as Robertson’s visit are at the heart of concerns about the surveillance: privileged legal conversations between lawyer and client in a diplomatic residence were recorded and, later, accessed from IP addresses in the United States and Ecuador.

Robertson was only one of at least three Australian lawyers and more than two dozen other legal advisers from around the world that were caught up in the surveillance operation.

Long-time WikiLeaks adviser Jennifer Robinson was one of the other Australian lawyers caught in the spying operation.

“It’s important that clients can speak frankly and freely in a confidential space with their lawyers in order to be able to protect themselves and ensure that they have the best possible legal strategy and that the other side does not have advance notice of it,” Robinson said.

Referring to a Spanish allegation that the US Government had advance notice of legal conversations in the embassy, she said: “That is … a huge and a serious breach of [Assange’s] right to a defence and a serious breach of his fair trial rights”.

On Monday evening (Sydney time), Assange will face an extradition hearing relating to US criminal charges against him for his role in the WikiLeaks releases of classified US Government material.

The extradition hearing comes amid a flurry of activity related to Assange: on Friday his legal team also confirmed they will try to seek asylum for the WikiLeaks boss in France, and on Thursday an English court heard that Assange was offered a US presidential pardon if he agreed to say that Russia was not involved in a 2016 leak of Democratic Party emails.

The offer of a pardon was allegedly made by the US congressman Dana Rohrabacher when he visited Assange in the embassy in August 2017. Rohrabacher has denied he was making the offer on behalf of Donald Trump.

‘It’s an occupational hazard for human rights lawyers’

The surveillance was uncovered via a very public investigation into the Spanish company contracted by the Ecuadorian Government to provide security at the embassy, UC Global.

WikiLeaks Spanish lawyer, Aitor Martinez, told the ABC the surveillance came to light after Assange was arrested, when former UC Global employees provided a large file of material.

“This consisted of recordings from cameras installed in the embassy and hidden microphones; recordings made with secret microphones placed inside the embassy; hundreds of secret copies of the passports of Mr Assange’s visitors; multiple emails exchanged between the company owner and the employees,” Martinez said.

The recording of lawyers and legal conversations was not accidental, according to the Spanish criminal case, which is now investigating UC Global and its owner, former Spanish Navy marine David Morales.

“David Morales was justifying himself by saying that he had been expressly asked for this information, sometimes referring to ‘the Americans’,” a UC Global employee turned prosecution witness said.

“He sent on several occasions — via email, by phone and verbally — some lists of targets in which we had to pay special attention … they were mainly Mr Assange’s lawyers.”

“I wasn’t surprised at all. It’s an occupational hazard for human rights lawyers. You’re bugged, you’re followed by secret police, you’re spied upon,” said Robertson, one of Australia and the UK’s most respected human rights barristers for almost 50 years.

Robinson — also an Australian citizen — was spied on while providing confidential legal advice to Assange.

“It is incredibly troubling that our secret and privileged legal conversations with Julian Assange were recorded and apparently handed to US authorities,” she told the ABC.

“It is one of the most fundamental principles of protecting attorney-client relationships that we are able to have confidential and private meetings, to discuss legal strategy.”

The concerns about illegal monitoring of confidential legal discussions may become part of his defence, with his lawyers expected to argue that the espionage has denied Assange his basic legal rights.

Foreign Minister Marise Payne did not respond to ABC questions about the Spanish case. The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFAT) also declined to discuss it, only noting that it had previously sought assurances that Assange would be treated appropriately under UK law.

“The Australian Government cannot intervene in any extradition request for Mr Assange, which is a matter for the UK authorities,” a DFAT spokeswoman said.

Robinson said that she believed Canberra had not done enough to protect Assange, an Australian citizen.

“This is a case in which an Australian citizen is facing 175 years in prison in the United States for the same publication for which he won a Sydney Peace Prize and the Walkley award for the most outstanding contribution to journalism,” she said, referring to WikiLeaks’ publication in 2010 and 2011 of confidential US documents that revealed, among other things, war crimes and illegal spying on world leaders.

“His Australian lawyers — all of us Australian citizens — have [also] had our rights as lawyers and our ability to give him a proper defence superseded by the US and potentially the UK Government.

“This is something that the Australian Government ought to be taking very seriously and ought to be raising both with the UK and with the United States. It is time the Australian Government stands up for this Australian citizen and stops his extradition.”

The file

The ABC has obtained hundreds of internal UC Global documents, videos, audio files and photos tendered in the Spanish case, which commenced in April last year days after Spanish newspaper El Pais published videos and audio of Assange and guests being spied on in the embassy.

The files reveal the remarkable and expanding secret surveillance targeting the WikiLeaks boss and his guests.

In an email from September 2017, Morales ordered UC Global staff to find out what the walls around Assange’s bedroom were made of, and to photograph the embassy’s rooms and its furniture.

Then in December, UC Global updated the embassy’s camera system, installing audio-capable cameras.

A month later, and under instructions from Morales, they installed a listening device in the false base of the meeting room’s fire extinguisher.

They also installed a microphone in the women’s bathroom — a place where Assange would regularly hold sensitive legal meetings.

The case is being investigated by Spain’s federal court, the Audencia Nacional, which is examining whether Morales and UC Global are guilty of breaching both Assange’s privacy and lawyer-client privilege, as well as crimes relating to misappropriation of funds, bribery, and money laundering.

“From 2015 to mid-2018, when UC Global lost the embassy’s security contract, a battery of illegal espionage measures was deployed, with massive interference in the privacy of [Assange], in his communications with his [legal] team, in meetings with his doctors, and in general against everyone close to him,” a criminal complaint filed by Assange’s Spanish lawyers stated.

“In those years the defendants created a sort of ‘Big Brother’ in which all the movements of Mr Assange and the people close to him were monitored.”

The case commenced after a group of Spanish citizens contacted senior WikiLeaks employees and demanded a significant sum of money in return for what they said was voluminous proof of the espionage.

A former UC Global employee — who cannot be identified for legal reasons — also separately approached WikiLeaks, wanting to reveal what they saw as the illegal behaviour of their former company.

WikiLeaks referred the case to Spanish courts, who launched an investigation and arrested Morales. He was later released on bail.

“This spying did not only affect Mr Assange’s lawyers, it also affected all of his visitors, including journalists,” Martinez said.

“It got to the point where, during a visit to Mr Assange, the head of Ecuador’s intelligence service [Rommy Vallejo, on December 21, 2017] was also spied on,” Martinez added.

“In the meeting between Mr Vallejo and Mr Assange the possible release [from the embassy] of Mr Assange in a few days later was discussed.”

Within hours of that secret meeting, which was known to only a few people, the US Ambassador to Ecuador complained to Ecuadorian authorities, and the next day the US issued an international arrest warrant for Assange, Martinez said.

“That leads us to believe that the conversation was urgently sent to the US authorities and that they urgently issued the international arrest warrant the next day,” he said.

Martinez was himself spied on while having legal meetings with Assange at the embassy.

“Mr Assange began to suspect that he was being spied upon … so he asked us to hold the most sensitive meetings in the women’s toilet at the back of the building,” Martinez recalled.

“We honestly thought it was an exaggerated step to hold our legal meetings in the women’s toilet, where he would even open the water tap to avoid anyone listening.

“It was interesting to find out that Mr Assange was, in fact, correct: the material before the court proves that UC Global knew the meetings were held inside the women’s toilet, as they proceeded to install an additional microphone [there].”

‘It goes to the heart of client-lawyer privilege’

While the case made headlines in Europe and the UK, there has been little to no discussion here about what it means for the Australian citizens and lawyers caught up in the alleged espionage operation.

The Law Council of Australia told the ABC the alleged surveillance operation was “deeply disturbing”.

“The allegations that Julian Assange’s conversations with his lawyer were being recorded are really serious,” the council’s president, Pauline Wright said.

“If you can’t have that full, frank discussion without fear that that’s being recorded and potentially released to the authorities … it erodes trust in the whole system.

“It goes to the heart of the client lawyer privilege.”

The file also reveals that Morales’ surveillance project — dubbed Operation Hotel — did not just observe Assange and his guests. Internal UC Global documents reveal staff also stole or illicitly photographed visitors’ belongings.

The file includes photos of passports, mobile phones, computers and other electronic devices owned by dozens of activists, journalists, lawyers and public figures that visited Assange.

The file also reveals a growing desire, on Morales’ part, for ubiquitous surveillance of Assange and his visitors.

Morales directed UC Global to scrutinise particular people visiting Assange, whom he refers to as “el huesped” (the guest).

“We must … create or improve the following profiles (personal data, relationship with the guest, phones, emails, number of visits, et cetera) of these regular visitors or collaborators of the guest,” he said.

He lists nine people, one of whom is Robinson.

“We must do everything to know their data … I want a person completely dedicated to this work, so if you have to hire someone for it, tell me,” Morales said.

“All this must be considered top secret.”

UC Global staff sometimes resisted their boss’s more intrusive requests. In December 2017, Morales allegedly directed an employee to steal the used nappy of a baby who sometimes accompanied his mother when she visited Assange.

The theft was necessary, Morales said, to DNA test faecal matter to establish if the child was Assange’s son.

“I decided to talk to the mother of the child,” the employee said in his statement to the court.

“When we were outside of the embassy, I told her that she must not take the child to the embassy anymore because they planned to steal her baby’s diapers to prove whether he was the son of Julian Assange.”

‘Amigos americanos’

The Spanish criminal complaint states the turbo-charged surveillance operation began after Morales travelled to Las Vegas in 2015 for a security fair. There, he signed a contract with Las Vegas Sands, a company owned by billionaire Trump donor Sheldon Adelson, according to the complaint.

Ostensibly, the contract was to provide security services to Adelson on his mega yacht, the Queen Miri.

But, when Morales returned to Spain, he told UC Global staff they were now “playing in first division”, according to two witness statements tendered in the case.

“[Morales] said he’d gone to the ‘dark side’, referring to himself as a casual collaborator with US authorities, and he said that as a result of this collaboration, ‘The Americans will get us contracts all over the world’,” one witness said in his statement.

Throughout the operation, the employees were repeatedly told by Morales that the surveillance operation was being directed by people he referred to as “amigos Americanos” (American friends).

Concerned about the increasingly illegal behaviour, the UC Global associate pressed Morales on the euphemistic references to “Americans”, demanding to know exactly who they were working for.

According to the statement, Morales replied: “la inteligencia de Estados Unidos” (United States intelligence).

“However, when I asked him who was the particular intelligence person he was meeting to provide them information, Mr Morales ended the conversation and told me that this topic was handled exclusively by him outside the company,” the UC Global associate told prosecutors.

The associate told the court he had repeated and heated discussions with Morales about the operation and who was behind it.

Once such conversation ended with Morales making the gesture of opening his shirt and saying: “I’m a mercenary!”

US action

At first, Morales collected the surveillance footage and delivered it by hand to unknown people in the US.

Later, he asked staff to create a file server and then a secret website to stream the embassy cameras.

A UC Global employee responsible for running the secret website told the Spanish court he noted at least one visitor to the site with an American IP address.

In a Spanish interview, Morales said neither he nor UC Global staff installed any listening devices in the embassy and suggested WikiLeaks had placed the microphones around the embassy.

When the ABC asked questions of the US embassy in Canberra, it referred questions to the US justice department, which did not respond by deadline.

The ABC also sent questions to the CIA and the US Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Neither responded by deadline.

Smart Spying, Children, 5G and Health Effects

This is a real issue, particularly in the hands of industry and members of the public. There is a range of information provided below and videos. The one that concerns me is the 8 year old child who a hacker spoke to in her bedroom. What if this person is a paedophile?

The article below provides solutions on how to avoid surveillance and what to be aware of.

In the public interest, definitely.

Is Your Cell Phone Spying On You?

Author: Guest, Last updated: January 30, 2020

Is your cell phone spying on you? Even if it is, does it really matter? You’re no criminal, right? Should you protect yourself in any case? In this guest post, Lois Cadwallader answers all these questions and more and shares 15 ways you can protect yourself from this personal intrusion:

Have you ever had the feeling that “someone is listening?” Well, they are. And it’s more than just your cell phone. Most newer electronic devices are seeded with sensors.

What’s interesting, is the smartphone has probably become the most important personal identifier and locator.
Think about it. What do most people have with them always? Their phones.

How do smartphones provide surveillance? They:

  • Listen
  • Locate
  • Log personal data

They Listen

I recently had my own experience with this. I carry my phone on airplane mode with Bluetooth and WiFi off to safeguard against exposure to electromagnetic radiation. (Find more information on Bluetooth radiation dangers here.)

I had turned my phone back on to check for messages and saw a friend zipping along on a bike path. “Diane Day! Diane Day,” I called out loudly. Well, she was riding so fast that she didn’t hear me. But someone else did.

Within a few hours, I had a personal message from her on Facebook … but it was suspicious. It didn’t sound like her. Sure enough, it was a hacker. Coincidental? Maybe. But the timing is just too close. I can’t help but wonder if my phone picked up her name, associated her with my Facebook friend, and someone went phishing.

I’d be interested in hearing your stories, please share in the comment section below.

It’s not just our smartphones.

Let’s take home managers, or smart speakers. Apple and Google admit that Alexa and Siri spy on you. Employees listen in on conversations, but only to monitor and improve the system, so they say. Industry claims the sampling is very small, and that they have in place strict anti-abuse regulations. [1,2,3]

And even more disturbing, the very systems we use to protect our homes may be the instruments of surveillance and invasive contact. An alarming report just surfaced about a hacker speaking to a young girl through the smart speaker in her bedroom. This video is downright creepy.

They Locate

Even when the GPS is turned off, your location can still be established using cell tower triangulation. Although this is not exactly “pin-pointing” it can get pretty close. This could be used for good or bad, depending on who wants to know your whereabouts. [4]

man holding phone to connect

They Log Personal Data

Your smartphone and other smart devices collect, analyze, and record thousands of interactions every day. It is no secret that this information is available to 3rd party advertisers. But it’s for “your benefit” – It’s like having a “personal shopper” hunt out the best deals for you.

Google says they don’t “sell” your personal information. They just place advertisements in your purview, based on your trends and search history. [5]

And Apple boasts, “What happens on your iPhone stays on your iPhone.” However, a NY Post investigator begs to differ.

He discovered that he was being “tracked,” by 3rd parties and that personal information had been shared, contrary to the published privacy policy. [6]

Are You OK With Massive Data Collection And Retention?

What About Hackers?

In the article, “Smart Homes Might be Getting too Smart. Start Worrying,” the author makes the stunning point that the danger is not just that hackers could know when you are on vacation and hack your smart lock and break into your home. That’s bad enough. But also there is the broader danger that hackers could commandeer hundreds of thousands of smartphones and smart devices to request access to a bank, social media platform, or government agency, thus forcing a DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack. [7]

This is actually what happened in the 2016 Mirai botnet that crashed the web. [8]

Isn’t Being Connected A Good Thing?

In the book, Owned: Property, Privacy and the New Digital Serfdom, by Joshua A. T. Fairfield, 2017, the author discusses what it means that our environment is seeded with more sensors than ever before. [9]

Our dishwashers, smart televisions, internet-enabled home thermostats, smart meters, Fitbits and smartphones constantly gather information about us and our environment.

Objects of the Internet Of Things

Who owns that information? You might be surprised at the answer.

When you purchase a smartphone or any smart device you relinquish ownership of your personal information. Industry owns your personal information. It is buried in hard-to-read, small-font terms-of-service agreements.

5G will only make it worse, as the sensors and transmitters are brought closer and closer, right into our neighborhoods, connecting all of the smart gadgets in the smart homes. This is not just “real time” listening. There is huge data collection, analysis, and retention by government and industry. [10,11]

Why? You guessed it. There is nothing new under the sun.

Money and power, money and power, money and power.

Money, Money, Money

Technology is a trillion dollar business. Industry and government are riding high on the enormous profits. Smartphone ownership is fast becoming a “right” and a “necessity” for life. Ask any person under 50 years old, “What’s the one thing you cannot and will not go without?” The answer is usually, “My phone.”

man riding on money

So, we now have a product with almost 100% dependence for both business and personal use. And the consumer is more than happy to pay for the latest smartphone upgrade.

American companies alone are estimated to have spent over $19 billion in 2018 acquiring and analyzing consumer data, according to the Interactive Advertising Bureau. [12,13]

And Then There’s Power.

person looking at the money at the center of the world

They would need an Infra-structure in place for surveillance and compliance assurance.

  • They would need to control technology in order to control information.
  • They would need to control financial transactions.
  • They would need to control the military.
  • Food, prescriptions, electricity, fuel, etc., all controlled by technology.
  • They would want to keep the population dependent (if not addicted) to the services under their control.

In short, they would need surveillance, surveillance, surveillance.

Where could this possibly be going? Dr. Jeremy Naydler, author and philosopher writes about the disturbing scenario of the global electronic intelligence in, “5G – The Big Picture.” [14]

And check out this edgy film, 5G APOCALYPSE – THE EXTINCTION EVENT. It is a full-length documentary by Sacha Stone exposing the 5G existential threat to humanity. OK, it might be a little hyperbolic. But if even half of this is true, yikes!

The power of artificial intelligence and other advanced technologies will be enormous. Vladimir Putin said, those in possession of artificial intelligence will rule the world. The processing speed and knowledge base of artificial intelligence will be so great, it will seem all-knowing to most. [15]

And President Trump states in the National Security Report, “We will improve America’s digital infrastructure by deploying a secure 5G Internet capability nationwide. These improvements will increase national competitiveness, benefit the environment and improve our quality of life.” [16]

Linked to a global network of cameras and audio devices, made of non-biological materials, artificial intelligence will appear to be omnipresent, omnipotent, and immortal. Those acquainted with biblical prophecy speculate that AI will be the platform for the one-world dictator. [17]

There’s a race for technological domination because that equals power. And surveillance is a necessary part of it.

But I’m Not A Criminal

The thinking goes something like this, “If I’m not engaged in any criminal behaviors, I shouldn’t mind if I’m monitored. Surveillance keeps us all safer from crime and terrorism.”

To be fair, there are some benefits to this “tracking” involving safety, identifying medical emergencies, solving crimes, finding missing persons, etc.

So, why should you care? One word. China.

Spy coming out our phones

China is using smart phones and other smart devices to massively spy on its citizens. They assign a “Social Credit Score” to base reward and punishment. [18,19,20,21]

It could never happen here.” Famous last words.

Silicon Valley is already building a Chinese-style social credit system. [22]
And one could argue that in the US there is already an un-written social credit system solidly in place, just waiting for the right people to implement its rewards and punishments.

It all sounds a little far-fetched; conspiratorial. But still, it should give reason for pause and reflection. How much of our privacy are we willing to relinquish for the sake of convenience? What are we exchanging for ultra-connectivity? And is it worth it?

Is There Anything We Can Do?

Thankfully, yes.

Here are 15 steps you can take to reduce the spy-factor in your life.

1 – Unplug

Unplug, turn off, disconnect as much as possible.

A human pulling a plug connected to a brain

2 – Be Aware Of Your Appliances

Seek out older models of appliances that do not have a WiFi feature or dis-arm the WiFi component of new appliances. This is difficult, but possible with a little bit of research. (Still confused about the dangers of WiFi? Read this article on why WiFi is not safe.)

3 – Keep Airplane Mode On And WiFi And Bluetooth Off

If you are “EMF savvy,” you know that other than completely powering off, the only safe way to carry a cell phone on your body is to:

  • Turn Airplane mode ON
  • Turn Bluetooth and WiFi OFF

This shuts down all electromagnetic energy. And of course, shuts down all transmission and reception. Thus, you are un-connected. So, you must check for messages periodically.

You can still use other features, like calendar and camera. And you can still access downloaded items.

But beware! Some of the newer phones (and tablets) have an automatic re-connect feature. So, you must double check to ensure that Airplane mode is ON and Bluetooth and WiFi remain OFF when your phone or tablet is close to you. These devices “want” to be connected and are programmed to do so. Learn about cell phone radiation protection here.

A “Faraday Bag” is another option for carrying your phone.

4 – Get A Meter

What about the sneaky factor? Since most phones have a sealed battery that can no longer be removed, one cannot really know if it is truly “off.” The only way to be assured that there is no beacon signal emitting from your phone or appliances is to meter.

You can do that yourself quite easily with the right kind of meter.

And as we progress deeper and deeper into the mesh of electronic surveillance, now might be a good time to acquire a meter.

5 – Use A Land-line

Many of my friends no longer have a wired telephone line. We still keep ours. I don’t know how much longer they will even be available. But, I recommend if you have a land-line, keep it. If you do not have one, inquire as to whether or not you can install one.
Important – This should be completely wired with no additional wireless hand set.

You might be Interested in Lloyd’s extensive article on Cordless phone dangers.

6 – Resist The Home Manager / Smart Speakers

They are fun…convenient. They are all the “new rage” in technology. But come on’ – do we reeeeeally need them? And do we really want them listening, locating, logging?
I say, no!

7 – Be Mindful

Smart devices, appliances, electronic key fobs, and even toys are always listening. And sometimes even recording.

8 – Use Technology Against Technology

There are a few products that claim to block techno-spies. I have not checked them out yet. Worth a look.
Use webcam and microphone blockers and anti-malware software. When browsing the internet, go “incognito.”

9 – Check Privacy Options If You Use Social Media

Use social media with caution. Be sure you are aware of and use privacy options. You need to check these periodically, as they do change.

You can take it a step further and have your social media presence scrubbed. While you can delete your Facebook account relatively easily, getting these firms to remove your information is time-consuming, complicated, and sometimes impossible. In fact, the process is so burdensome that you may want to consider paying a service to do it on your behalf.

10 – Hardwire As Much As Possible

Hardwire your computer, mouse, printer, etc.
Wired is more secure than wireless as there is less chance of someone intercepting.

11 – Install Anti-Virus Systems On All Wireless Devices

Although not 100% fail-proof, they do make it difficult for hackers to intrude into your technology devices.

12 – Go To Advanced Security And Privacy Solutions

There are ways to disable the “listening” function of your smartphone and smart devices. There are also ways to delete your recorded information. Takes some research. I have not done this yet. I hear that it is difficult, but doable. My next project.

13 – Simplify

While cutting-edge technology can be exhilarating, there is something attractive about slow and simple living. Spend more time in the wilderness where there are no sensors. There is something restorative about the natural world and a small footprint.

14 – Take A detailed Audit Of Every Possible Source Of Surveillance In Your Home.

For a detailed list of “smart” devices that could possibly be used for surveillance, see:
Cadwallader, Bill, “EXPOSED: The Electronic Sickening of America and How to Protect Yourself—Includes the Dangers of 5G and Smart Devices,” Stop Dirty Electricity, Las Vegas, NV 2018

Bill shares over 30 pages of up-to-date information from his annual visit to the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. You may be surprised how many things in your environment have turned “smart” and could be used as a surveillance tool, even when turned off.

15 – Some Would Say Completely Eliminate Technology

This is difficult. And I admire the purists. I really do. But to run a business in the modern world, I have to use a pc and smart phone. If you are completely retired and don’t need electronics, it might be doable. You also might be able to move to a rural area. That would be ideal.

We may not be able to avoid surveillance entirely. But we can reduce the spy factor by taking some simple steps. Do what you can do today.

Many thanks to Lois Cadwallader for this guest post.

Lois Cadwallader EMF writer

Author bio: Lois Cadwallader, MA, has been a professional educator all her life. She lives in Las Vegas, Nevada and enjoys volunteering in after-school clubs, hiking and cycling. She is the co-author of Exposed: The Electronic Sickening of America and How to Protect Yourself.

Sources and Bibliography

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2. Google and Amazon really DO want to spy on you: Patent reveals future versions of their voice assistants will record your conversations to sell you products By Tim Collins, Dec. 15, 2017. www.consumerwatchdog.org/privacy-technology/google-and-amazon-really-do-want-spy-you-patent-reveals-future-versions-their
3. No secrets at home anymore now Amazon’s Alexa is spying on us, Geoffrey A Fowler, May 07 2019 www.stuff.co.nz/business/world/112528222/no-secrets-at-home-anymore-now-amazons-alexa-is-spying-on-us
4. Accurate Location Accurate Location Detection by Minh Tran, DMD transition.fcc.gov/pshs/911/Apps%20Wrkshp%202015/911_Help_SMS_WhitePaper0515.pdf
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6. It’s the middle of the night. Do you know who your iPhone is talking to? By Geoffrey A. Fowler, Technology Columnist, May 28, 2019 www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/05/28/its-middle-night-do-you-know-who-your-iphone-is-talking/
7. Smart homes might be getting too smart. Start worrying. Commentary: When better features mean worse ethics, should we change what we buy? By David Priest, October 31, 2019 www.cnet.com/news/smart-homes-might-be-getting-too-smart-start-worrying/
8. The Mirai botnet explained: How teen scammers and CCTV cameras almost brought down the internet by Josh Fruhlinger March 9, 2018 www.csoonline.com/article/3258748/the-mirai-botnet-explained-how-teen-scammers-and-cctv-cameras-almost-brought-down-the-internet.html
9. Owned: Property, Privacy and the New Digital Serfdom, by Joshua A. T. Fairfield, 2017 New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2017.
10. Who Owns Americans’ Personal Information and What Is It Worth? Robert Shapiro and Siddhartha Aneja, March 8, 2019 assets.futuremajority.org/uploads/report-for-future-majority-on-the-value-of-people-s-personal-data-shapiro-aneja-march-8-2019.pdf
11. When smart devices watch you, what do they do with the data? By Kim Komando USA TODAY, June 20, 2019 www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/2019/06/20/what-do-smart-devices-do-data-they-collect-you/1483051001/
12. U.S. Firms to Spend Nearly $19.2 Billion on Third-Party Audience Data & Data-Use Solutions in 2018, Up 17.5% From 2017 Dec. 05, 2018, IBA (Interactive Advertising Bureau) Retrieved from www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181205005139/en/U.S.-Firms-Spend-19.2-Billion-Third-Party-Audience
13. Tech spending will near $4 trillion this year. Here’s where all the money is going and why by Eric Rosenbaum April 8, 2019 www.cnbc.com/2019/04/08/4-trillion-in-tech-spending-in-2019-heres-where-the-money-is-going.html
14. “5G – The Big Picture.” By Dr. Jeremy Naydler, April, 2019 Retrieved from takebackyourpower.net/5g-the-big-picture/
15. Vladimir Putin Says Whoever Leads in Artificial Intelligence Will Rule the World, By David Meyer, September 4, 2017 fortune.com/2017/09/04/ai-artificial-intelligence-putin-rule-world/
16. Ultra-fast 5G wireless service declared national security priority by White House by Danny Crichton, December 19, 2017 techcrunch.com/2017/12/19/ultra-fast-5g-wireless-service-declared-national-security-priority-by-white-house/
17. Will Artificial Intelligence Create Pathway To The Antichrist? By Britt Gillette, November 19, 2019 www.prophecynewswatch.com/article.cfm?recent_news_id=3610#QUFHUABS0Vj1W5pv.99
18. China has started ranking citizens with a creepy ‘social credit’ system — here’s what you can do wrong, and the embarrassing, demeaning ways they can punish you, by Alexandra Ma Oct 29, 2018 www.businessinsider.com/china-social-credit-system-punishments-and-rewards-explained-2018-4
19. How China Is Using “Social Credit Scores” to Reward and Punish Its Citizens, By Charlie Campbell / Chengdu, 2019 time.com/collection/davos-2019/5502592/china-social-credit-score/
20. Chinese Social Credit Score: Utopian Big Data Bliss Or Black Mirror On Steroids? By Bernard Marr, Jan 21, 2019 www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2019/01/21/chinese-social-credit-score-utopian-big-data-bliss-or-black-mirror-on-steroids/#325c8bc848b8
21. ‘Social credit score’: China set to roll out ‘Orwellian’ mass surveillance tool By Bill Gertz – The Washington Times – December 9, 2019 www.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/dec/9/social-credit-system-china-mass-surveillance-tool-/
22. Uh-oh: Silicon Valley is building a Chinese-style social credit system, By Mike Elgan, August 2019 www.fastcompany.com/90394048/uh-oh-silicon-valley-is-building-a-chinese-style-social-credit-system

Former Victorian Premier Brumby Quits Huawei Board and Joins La Trobe University

My first feeling in this is of the IT trade war between China and the United States.  My next feeling is those in prominent positions joining industry and the revolving door that exists between government and industry.  The original intent of government was that these entities were separate as government ensured neutrality so that it could represent the people.  Unfortunately in the ruling class they all know each other, they discuss the Boards the are on and they have their own agendas.   Business is business.

The video I produced today is on greed.  I see the blindness of economic objectives outside of human wellbeing.  The disconnect is furthered as industry profits become the goal and the impact on civil society a minor issue.  This becomes increasingly evident when one investigates the range of views about 5G and the race between the US and China with IT industry lobbyists taking up positions in Communications as the regulator of the industry.  Clearly it is not possible to regulate an industry in the public interest if a person has come from the very industry that is to be regulated. That means they know the people, and often, if not always, have an agenda to promote that industry. This is where the public interest is neglected.  We have seen this in the United States and the health implications for civil society are sending out alarm around the world.

The article below informs that the former Victorian Premier John Brumby was on the board of Huawei.  There is discussion about Chinese criminality and the potential for the Communist party to spy and gather data.  I would assert all the IT companies are spying and data gathering and are contracted to share data with intelligence agencies, notably the 5 Eyes spy network.  When you investigate the Boards of IT companies you see the vested interests sitting there which include multinational companies, big data, IT companies, military, intelligence, Accounting firms, universities, former government ministers or public servants and the list goes on.  In the country they operate in, the people believe the company is owned by the nation or they have no idea that their data is traded without real consent and used to sell products and services.  The greed is what moves this disregard for privacy.

Clearly Huawei would be influenced, if not directed, by the Chinese Communist Party, they are the largest telecommunications company in China note $8.7 billion in profits.  Refer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huawei

The issues for Australia are to what extent can the Chinese government penetrate Australia through high level appointments and economic power?  Refer foreign ownership of homes (real estate):  https://www.news.com.au/finance/real-estate/buying/fears-one-million-aussie-homes-could-soon-be-owned-by-foreign-buyers/news-story/c50a4112bab4f3ed8fae27277f313f54

Australian land sales https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/china-increases-its-stake-in-australian-land-20181220-p50ng0.html

I recall Alexander Downer some years ago attempting to ban protests of Falun Gong outside the Chinese Embassy in Canberra. The government went to court with Falun Gong and the latter won.   Refer http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2005/s1389732.htm

I interviewed on radio a Chinese woman whose husband had been murdered in China as they practiced Falun Gong.  Just last week I noticed they were protesting in Melbourne about organ harvesting of practitioners.  This is the very core of the argument about recoupling human rights to trade.  Clinton was the one who decoupled human rights.   This link refers to Hiliary Clinton favouring economics over human rights when it serves US interests refer https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/4735087/Hillary-Clinton-Chinese-human-rights-secondary-to-economic-survival.html

The issue of Guantanamo Bay, 911, the Middle East wars, rendition and its own human rights violations inclusive of leaving the UN Human Rights Council are largely ignored internationally.  One rule for one another rule for others. It is all about the money but the argument will frame it as benefiting the people.

The core issue is the economic war that seeks to use issues to weaken the competitor. This is where the nation state serves economic interests and is not representing the people. Refer https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/10/sanctions-over-china-human-rights-may-strengthen-us-position-in-trade-talks.html

Therefore, where do executives and high profiled people draw the line or is there no line?  If the focus is strongly on career, profits, political and business interests at the expense of the public interest then where do we end up?  We are walking in the shadow of the United States and the ideological economic rationalism of privatisation of public assets. This utilises government taxation to take on the risk in projects to enable the private sector to lower risk and project high profits and in some cases the public asset is transferred to them.  This dominates the discussion as equity financing replaces government taxation attracting high interest rates (exponential) and demands profits through users pay e.g. toll ways. The original purpose of government provision of public services quietly transforms into private provision of government services in million and billion dollar public/private partnership deals.

The contraction of global markets with a mentality of cut and move on (acquisitions, arbitrage, futures markets, speculation in profit maximisation) diminishes the public purse which typically had longer horizons with cross subsidisation built into government funding planning to ensure egalitarianism as advancing Australia Fair and public order.

Ultimately under the new rules of private engagement the public pay more (in taxation, GST, direct fees, fines, taxes) out of ever more diminishing incomes.  The multiple propensity to consume (MPC) shrinks which impacts economic growth but is hidden by activity from both foreign and domestic companies.  The chairs rearrange.

This most favoured status given to the megolithic multi-nationals (changing names, subsidiaries, rebranding) gives the impression of wealth but the reality is equity finance is expensive, the risk is carried by the firm and attracts high costs and interest rates. It deepens indebtedness which is the lever that can be used to influence domestic policy that would have funded social programs. This is the opportunity cost in favour of business. Thus the left/right propaganda is used to weaken calls for public expenditure as unrealistic and economically unviable. This is how the middle class becomes pauparised as the extremes start to polarise between those with extreme wealth and those living in extreme poverty.  This is how policy creates social unrest and blames the public through repressive techniques.  The shape changer of democracy takes on a totalitarian profile with increasing calls for surveillance, funding a security apparatus with intrusive technologies (purchased from these IT companies) removing human rights and privacy to ensure control rather than squarely facing the reality of an economic mismanagement and greed as the driver of market concentration and serving of specific foreign interests.  Egalitarianism and social democracy transforms into a compliance framework that favours the few over the rights of the many and is ultimately de-stabilising globally as we are all connected.  The public believes the propaganda that budgets are balanced when the debt is off the balance sheet as the risk was transferred.

So powerful companies like Huawei and Google for example, both titans in the IT industry have disproportionate concentration of power and hence, political influence and penetration into markets to serve interests and agendas that may provide token jobs (benefits) but ultimately are the old paradigm of profit maximisation. The profits move off shore and we see the economic cake unravel to be replaced by AI and automation.  At the same time ‘greed’ as dis-ease is not in balance with ecological limits (silent spring) takes more than it needs and is non responsive to natural rhythms that rebalance planetary systems. This is why the titanic is sinking and the planet is groaning under the strain of humans who have no real connection to themselves, each other or the natural sytems.  The nature of ‘greed’ is to follow selfish interests not respond to expanded best interest that includes resources (natural bounty).  This disconnect renders many of the capitalist/communist (whatever) business interests blind to the dangerous situation they have set up.  Some may smile and decide to fly to the moon or mars, but ultimately karma follows as the real problem was never solved at its inception. The real insecurity, fear and greed fuelling imbalance. When this is investigated inequality disappears, natural imbalances recalibrate and we begin to see ourselves in each other. This is the shift in consciousness I refer to in my video.  I felt the video permeate this blog as I feel inspired to integrate it into an example given by the article.

So a few questions for society to consider:

  • Is it in the national interest for political or influential figures to join with foreign multinational companies and share their knowledge, resources and networks?
  • Given the US trade war any persons or entities involved in Huawei becomes a ‘threat’ as US penetration in Australia evokes its influence in networks, government, policy, security and regulatory environments.  Is this in the Australian public interest?

Thus the wicked webs we weave that continues on a trajectory spiralling to the bottom until we awaken.  Only the truth sets us free.

https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/brumby-quits-huawei-board-days-after-us-criminal-charges-outlined-20190201-p50v10.html

Brumby quits Huawei board days after US criminal charges outlined

Former Victorian premier John Brumby has resigned from the board of Huawei’s Australian operations in a damaging blow to the Chinese technology giant just days after the US government outlined a criminal case against it.

Mr Brumby’s decision to quit comes two days after The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald revealed that Meng Wanzhou, the Huawei executive at the centre of the alleged global criminal conspiracy, established and oversaw the company’s activities in Australia between 2005 and 2011.

Former Victorian premier John Brumby.
Former Victorian premier John Brumby.CREDIT:PAUL JEFFERS

The former Labor politician’s future at Huawei Technologies (Australia) has been under a cloud since June, after he announced he was reviewing all his directorships upon assuming the role of Chancellor of Melbourne’s La Trobe University.

This week’s release of an indictment against Huawei and key executives by the US Justice Department has increased interest in Mr Brumby’s position on the company’s board.

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Mr Brumby said on Friday that the timing of his resignation, which will be effective from next month, was unrelated to the scandal enveloping the company.

He said he had informed the board a year ago of his intention to resign and was proud of the firm’s local growth.

‘‘We have had some challenging times … Huawei Australia has continued to go from strength to strength.’’

Ms Wanzhou is alleged by the US to have been a key player in a conspiracy to defraud international banks and US officials about the company’s Iran operations. The criminal case against Huawei also involves allegations it stole trade secrets from rival T-Mobile.

Though there is no suggestion that Ms Wanzhou was engaged in any criminal activity in Australia, the US Department of Justice case against her and the company includes the period of time she was overseeing Huawei’s corporate governance and strategy in Australia.

The December arrest of Ms Wanzhou in Canada at the request of the US government triggered a strong response from Beijing, with two Canadian citizens and Chinese-born Australian writer Yang Hengjun detained in China.

Mr Brumby will become Chancellor of La Trobe University in March.
Mr Brumby will become Chancellor of La Trobe University in March.

Ms Wanzhou is the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the Chinese military.

Mr Brumby joined the Huawei board in Australia in 2011 shortly before the departure of Ms Wanzhou. Former foreign minister Alexander Downer and former Navy rear-admiral John Lord were also appointed to the Huawei board in an effort by the company to build political and defence credibility.

The high-profile Australian trio have been outspoken in defending Huawei against criticism from Australia and the US, whose respective intelligence agencies fear the company could be vulnerable to pressure from the Chinese Communist Party to spy on or sabotage data and phone networks.

Mr Brumby, Mr Lord and, until his 2014 appointment as Australia’s high commissioner to the UK, Mr Downer, have all previously pointed out that there has been no hard evidence produced anywhere to show Huawei was involved in espionage activities on behalf of the Chinese government.

The company has made a priority of ensuring its Australian directors have been looked after well at home and abroad. It is understood some Australian-based directors have been paid as much as $250,000 a year, though Huawei has declined to confirm this.

Despite its high-powered Australian board, Huawei has been prevented by successive Australian governments from participating in the NBN rollout and the 5G mobile network, with security agencies warning against the involvement of the Chinese firm.

Australia’s hard line position on Huawei has emboldened other western allies to restrict the Chinese company’s involvement in sensitive infrastructure.

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In a statement released in the wake of the US charges, Huawei said it was disappointed to learn of the charges and believed the US courts would find no evidence Ms Meng or the company breached US laws.