Category Archives: Discrimination

Does Legislated Religious Freedom Lead to Discrimination?

In the public interest.

I did have some confusion around the difference between freedom of religion and religious freedom.  today I am clear.  The former is about people having the freedom to follow a religion without persecution.  The latter is about a specific Religious Freedom to behaviour in ways in accordance with that religion.  Israel Falou would be a case in point. On the one hand he is practicing Religious Freedom believing homosexuals will go to Hell, on the other hand he is discriminating as he is viewing those who are homosexual as abominations in the eyes of God according to the Bible.

I will provide two viewpoints one from homosexuals and one from Christians. The underlying point is that religious observance can cause division in our society and potential discrimination and vilification.

http://www.lovethetruth.com/evils/homosexuality/abomination.htm

I note this statement as general and potentially dangerous to homosexuals as a community.  I do know a homosexual female couple and they certainly are NOT the following:

The homosexual activist movement and organized pedophiles are linked together by a common goal: To gain access to children for seduction into homosexuality.

The other side of perspective:

LGBTQ + Religion

This came into my inbox about the Religious Discrimination Bill.  Below is my video referring to Turning the Tide.

Religious Discrimination Bill threat to inclusive services

Hi susan,

Equality Australia has released a statement calling on the Government to remove unbalanced provisions in the proposed Religious Discrimination Bill, which threaten safe and inclusive workplaces and services.

These provisions would give licence to people to discriminate against others or make demeaning comments if they claim to be motivated by their religion, and would override long standing federal and state anti-discrimination laws.

CHP is committed to the principle that all workers and consumers in our sector should have a workplace, or receive a service, in dignity and without discrimination. That’s why we have signed up to urge the Government not to implement the Bill, and encourage others to join us.
Sign the discrimination statement
or learn more about the Bill and its impacts.

Faith-based organisations, including Anglicare Victoria, Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand, Jewish Care Victoria, McAuley Community Services for Women, Sacred Heart Mission and Uniting Vic.Tas, are also joining this call for action and have developed a dedicated faith-based organisation’s statement to call on Government to not implement the Bill.

To find out more, get in touch with David or Paige from Equality Australia.

My video on YouTube is below.  This reference is the book I am showing.  https://barnabasfund.org/en/news/Our-Religious-Freedom-campaign-booklet-Turn-The-Tide-quoted-extensively-during-parliamentary-debate

I discuss inspiration, direct connection and love.  The challenge is can you love the unloveable?

The video comments do not condone any sexual act that harms adults or children.  Abuse is another matter and has to be confronted and the perpetrator held to account and if possible, reformed.

I raise the issue of religious government. This is a card on the table in Australia likely linked to US far right politics.

This video was inspired.

Australian Bushfire Donations

The surprise with the fires in Australia was how much money has been spent to assist those homeless. Yet the irony is that 116,000 homeless in Australia are not seen in the same light.

All people in crisis should be assisted 100%. The issue is when we decide who is deserving who is not.

On a positive note what was great to see was our country coming together to help each other, which is our true nature.

To change the climate we must learn our true nature which is to respond to the human crisis not the market as a first responder.

What were the costs involved?

Bushfire donations: where will the millions that have been given be spent?

NSW RFS chief Shane Fitzsimmons says members will be consulted about how to allocate between competing priorities, such as bushfire victims and conditions for volunteer firefighters

Ben Doherty @bendohertycorro

Tue 7 Jan 2020 11.22 AEDT First published on Tue 7 Jan 2020 04.00 AEDT

Shares 388

Firefighters extinguish a blaze by the side of a road
Donations in the tens of millions of dollars have poured into Australian fire services, with NSW Rural Fire Service commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons saying the ‘extraordinary generosity will make a massive difference’. Photograph: Dean Lewins/AAP

The NSW Rural Fire Service says it will consult its members before deciding how to spend the extraordinary influx of bushfire donations, as it tries to weigh the intentions of those who have given money.

The head of the RFS, Shane Fitzsimmons, said allocating the “extraordinary” influx of donations from the public, now into the tens of millions of dollars, would be a challenge for the organisation, but that it was a “nice challenge to have”.

He pledged to spend the donations “where it was intended”, directing the money towards fire victims as well as the fire service itself.

The RFS, which has been the main focus of donations in the wake of the bushfires, is primarily funded by the state government, as Michael Eburn, an expert in emergency management at the Australian National University, has noted.

“People should understand, before they make their donation, that fundamentally they are making a donation to the NSW government,” Eburn wrote on Monday.

The online fundraising campaign run by comedian Celeste Barber has alone raised more than $33m, which will be distributed, not only to the NSW’s RFS, but its interstate equivalents, including Victoria’s Country Fire Authority and South Australia’s Country Fire Service.

Millions more have flowed to the RFS through private donations and other fundraising efforts.

Fitzsimmons said the depth and breadth of donations “reflects the best we’ve got in humanity”.

“I think it’s quite extraordinary and extremely generous,” he said.

Fitzsimmons said the organisation did not yet know how it would spend the donations, and that allocating the additional money would be a challenge, “but a nice challenge to have”.

“We will consult with members, we will make sure we understand firstly, what was the intention behind people contributing to that fund: was it to go to disaster victims, was it to go to make better arrangements and better conditions for volunteers? We will need to target the money to where people intended it to go.

“We need to make sure that we get something tangible, and we get some real benefit out of this, and we don’t want to lose sight of the fact that that extraordinary generosity will make a massive difference.”

The amount committed to the NSW RFS donations fund has dwarfed the donations raised in previous years.

The most recent donations fund annual report

from 2017-18 – showed gifts of $768,044 to the RFS, of which $546,000 was donated to individual brigades, and $222,000 to the central fund for distribution. The largest single donation was $25,000.

The central donations fund exists “solely for the purpose of supporting the volunteer-based fire and emergency service activities of the brigades”. It is unclear how the money will, or could, be divided with other fire services or with bushfire victims, if it has been donated to the Trustee for NSW Rural Fire Service and Brigades Donations Fund. But the trust deed allows the trustees to disburse funds as recommended by the RFS executive committee.

The service is also running dedicated fundraising appeals for the families of volunteer firefighters Samuel McPaul, Geoffrey Keaton and Andrew O’Dwyer, killed fighting fires this bushfire season.


Labor MP urges war-like national mobilisation to tackle Australia’s existential threat of climate crisis

Read more

The NSW RFS budget for this financial year is $424m, funded by the NSW state government.

Writing in The Big Smoke Australia, Eburn said donating to the RFS was commendable given the vital work it performs, but stressed that the organisation was a government funded and run agency.

“The RFS is not an organisation run by volunteers and funded by community donations,” he wrote. “The RFS is not a volunteer organisation, it is a government organisation that relies on volunteers.

“No doubt the trustees, the RFS, and brigades that benefit … and the trustees of the fund, will do their best to ensure that it is well spent to advance the RFS abilities in coming years but people should understand, before they make their donation, that fundamentally they are making a donation to the NSW government.”

In the wake of devastating fires in that state, the Victorian government has established a new government agency – Bushfire Recovery Victoria – to coordinate the state’s fire recovery. The agency, headed by former police chief commissioner Ken Lay, has been given a budget of $50m.

Lay said the new agency would work with local communities to guide their own recoveries.

“When disasters happen in local communities, the answers are generally in their community, so I’ll be looking for local people to give local advice, local resources to address these issues.”

Premier Daniel Andrews asked those wanting to help not to donate clothing, goods, or food, but money to the state government-run bushfire appeal.

“I know it’s tough to watch this all unfold and feel helpless. I know a lot of people want to get stuck in and lend a hand. But it’s important to remember that the emergency relief effort is being run by experienced organisations, and they don’t have space to sort or store donations.

“If you want to help, please consider donating to the Victorian Bushfire Appeal. Every dollar raised will go towards immediate support for those who have lost everything.

“Victorians have been incredibly generous already. After just a few days, the appeal is sitting at $2m, and our government will match the current amount raised.”