Category Archives: Whistle blowers

Roger Waters from Pink Floyd Sings for the Release of Julian Assange

I am a fan of Pink Floyd who were indeed ahead of their time.  Roger Walters is a talented and insightful artist who was invited to play as part of the calls to release Julian Assange who clearly is operating in the public interest.  He is a prisoner of conscience.  I note John Pilger, an Australian journalist has organised this event. t would be nice to hear of Australian artists doing the same.  He has not received equal consular support given his situation and the alliances that appear to take precedence over sovereignty.  

It is the highest love to stop tyranny.  The United States if it believes in democracy and human rights has an opportunity to demonstrate this. Its leaving of the UN Human Rights Council, along with Israel, is very concerning and sends a message that they are not defenders of human rights which is civilian protections.  I spoke in my video about resurrection, I sense that is how they turn around the war crimes and corruption.  You cannot speak values and not live them, if you do then the world loses respect and you lose face (as the Chinese say). 

I add to the calls for the release of whistleblowers and those who truly represent the people above self interest.  It takes enormous courage to reveal secrets, r crimes and criminality.  It is a duty to reveal corruption. In many respects these whistleblowers are doing the job of the ‘opposition’ who no longer is opposing but compromising in order to gain re-election, this is not in the public interest.

This case should be taken to an international Criminal Court, a precedent started whereby citizens can defend themselves against criminal allegations by foreign governments. He is not a US citizen I would place him in the realm of as a global citizen.  

Videos in this article can be found by pasting the link below.

Link: https://21stcenturywire.com/2019/09/03/roger-waters-serenades-british-home-secretary-calling-for-release-of-julian-assange/

Roger Waters ‘Serenades’ British Home Secretary, Calling for Release of Julian Assange

Roger Waters ‘Serenades’ British Home Secretary, Calling for Release of Julian Assange

Thousands of supporters gathered last night outside the British Home Office demanding to end to the unlawful detention and persecution of Julian Assange, who is currently being held in London’s notorious Belmarsh Prison. 

Crowds cheered as award-winning journalist John Pilger introduced Pink Floyd co-founder Roger Waters, performing on a small stage whilst serenading the British Home Secretary Priti Patel with an acoustic rendition of “Wish You Were Here.” Watch:

Barnaby Nerberka@barnabynerberka
 
 

VIDEO: Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters performs ‘Wish You Were Here’ outside the UK Home Office in support of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange @Ruptly

 
 
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After crowds chanted “Free, free Julian Assange,” Waters spoke to the crowd saying that he was “ashamed to be an Englishman” after the UK extraordinary rendition of Assange from Ecuadorian sovereign soil.

21WIRE editor Patrick Henningsen was on site reporting on the event and remarked on the crowd dynamics and the lack oj mainstream media presence, saying, “About one hour before the speakers arrived there were only a few hundred people around a small makeshift stage, but that soon turned into a few thousand ten minutes beforehand. This was an incredibly well-organized event, but interestingly, there was almost no mainstream media presence to speak of – no big UK print or broadcast names were in the press pit – which in itself is amazing considering the musical and cultural stature of someone like (Roger) Waters. But those who did attend were party to something really historic.”

SEE ALSO: Julian Assange: Deprivation of Justice and Double Standards in Belmarsh Prison

Watch the full performance by Roger Waters, including the introduction by John Pilger here:

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Youtube:  https://youtu.be/DwPgIbnyX5s

In addition, Gabriel Shipton, the brother of Julian Assange, also spoke outside UK Home Office protest, describing the cruel conditions of the detention suffered by his brother. Watch:

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YouTube: .https://youtu.be/G9ehKPp-5M0

Assange was apprehended and jailed for violating bail conditions following nearly seven years in residence under political asylum Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

Assange is now being lined up for extradition from the UK to the US, supposedly for his role in the 2010 leaks in conjunction with US Army intelligence whistleblower Chelsea Manning who is also currently being held in custody in the US as federal officials attempt to force Manning under duress to help federal prosecutors create new charges to convict Assange with.

READ MORE ASSANGE NEWS AT: 21st Century Wire Assange/Wikileaks Files

9/11 Whistleblower Philip Marshall Found Dead After Implicating Bush Administration

In the public interest.  I find this very distressing how those speaking up can be murdered.  That says we are dealing definitely with a crime scene.   His case is featured in a video below this story.

Those who are killed I am sure want their story to come out.  Is there any mistake we find their stories. I don’t think so.

9/11 Researcher Philip Marshall Found Dead: His Book Implicated Bush Administration

9/11 Researcher Philip Marshall Found Dead: His Book Implicated Bush Administration

RELATED: 9/11 and Philip Marshall Murder-Suicide Questions: My Trip To Murphys

Another ‘murder/suicide’?

Before Its News

“Philip Marshall wrote about conspiracy. Was he a victim of one? ‘9/11 Truther’ Philip Marshall and his entire family were recently found dead of gunshot wounds in what authorities are calling a murder suicide.

Marshall was a former airline pilot and a ‘9/11 Conspiracy Theorist’ and book writer who believed that the Bush administration, with cooperation from Saudi intelligence, had committed the ‘false flag’ terrorist attacks on September 11th, 2001. Marshall was also a former CIA and DEA pilot during the Iran/Contra Scandal. Marshall lived in fear for his life while writing his 9/11 Truther book implicating the United States government and George W. Bush in the ‘false flag’ attacks. Has the US government begun an all out assault on whistle blowers and so-called truthers?” (…) Read more

The story below is from The Mail Online and The Santa Barbara View

A pilot who wrote a conspiracy theory book about 9/11 is dead after he shot his two teenage children and family dog before turning the gun on himself. Micalia Phillips, 14, and her 17-year-old brother Alex, were also found dead at the home inside the gated Forrest Meadows community.

The former airline pilot’s controversial conspiracy book The Big Bamboozle: 9/11 and the War on Terror was released last year.

While he was writing it, Marshall believed that his life was in danger because of the allegations involved.

According to Santa Barbara View, during the editing and pre-marketing process of Marshall’s book, he expressed some degree of paranoia because the nonfiction work accused the George W. Bush administration of being in cahoots with the Saudi intelligence community in training the hijackers who died in the planes used in the attacks.

“Think about this,” Marshall said last year in a written statement, “The official version about some ghost (Osama bin Laden) in some cave on the other side of the world defeating our entire military establishment on U.S. soil is absolutely preposterous.”

Marshall went on to say: “The true reason the attack was successful is because of an inside military stand-down and a coordinated training operation that prepared the hijackers to fly heavy commercial airliners. We have dozens of FBI documents to prove that this flight training was conducted California, Florida and Arizona in the 18 months leading up to the attack.”

The veteran pilot confided that he was concerned about his 10-year, independent 9/11 study and most recent book since they pointed to the Saudis and the Bush intelligence community as the executioners of the attack that defeated all U.S. military defenses on Sept. 11, 2001.

Marshall said he knew his book might cause some people to take issue with him.

READ MORE PHILIP MARSHALL NEWS AT: 21st Century Wire Philip Marshall Files

Philip Marshall, a veteran airline captain and former government “special activities” contract pilot, had authored three books on Top Secret America, a group presently conducting business as the United States Intelligence Community. Marshall is the leading aviation expert on the September 11th attack, as well as a masterful storyteller. In his final book “The Big Bamboozle: 9/11 and the War on Terror,” a 2012 publication Marshall theorized it wasn’t al-Qaida but rather U.S. and Saudi government officials who orchestrated 9/11. In February 2013, he was found dead along with his two children in their home in California. Reports indicate all 3 died of gunshot wounds. Police regarded the case as a double murder- suicide case. But many pieces do not add up. Simply, a loving father and devoted husband would kill his children before turning the gun on himself. Besides, prior to his death, he had confided to his closest that he was terrified of his family being targeted by secret agents. This movie looks into this whistleblower’s investigations and tries to find out what he could have possibly found that cost his life and that of his loved ones.

Whistle-Blower McBride States Government Acting as a Totalitarian

In the public interest, courtesy of the Guardian.

I don’t think the government is acting. The suppression of the truth is perverting the course of justice, in my view.

A notable extract from below:

Boyle, the ATO whistleblower, similarly made an internal disclosure under the Public Interest Disclosure (PID) Act to the ATO. His complaint was investigated and dismissed, according to the ABC and the Nine Entertainment newspapers. Boyle then went public.

There are attempts to have people complain internally to ensure no public scrutiny, but if they are not able to act neutrally or seek to protect themselves then inevitably if the problem is not resolved, it escalates.  The lack of values is a core issue.  It is all very well to have mission statements and assert publicly the organisation has values but not act on it due to interference or fear. 

The issue in my own experience is reporting suspected corruption to regulators to be told the complaint is dismissed or not even investigated when evidence is available.  I perceive this practice is widespread and deeply problematic. There are other questions around underfunding regulators so that complaints are delayed.

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2019/jun/06/whistleblower-protections-a-sham-says-lawyer-whose-leaks-led-to-abc-raids

Whistleblower protections ‘a sham’, says lawyer whose leaks led to ABC raids

 This article is more than 3 months old

David McBride, who leaked information on special forces, says government is acting like a ‘totalitarian regime’

Leaks from whistleblower David McBride prompted this week’s raids on the ABC
 Leaks from whistleblower David McBride prompted this week’s raids on the ABC Photograph: Alexandra Back/Fairfax Media

The military lawyer whose leaks prompted this week’s police raids on the ABC has criticised Australia’s whistleblower protections as a “sham”, saying the government is acting like a “totalitarian regime” to shield itself from criticism.

David McBride is facing lengthy jail time for providing documents to the public broadcaster on the conduct of special forces in Afghanistan, which prompted the Wednesday raids.

McBride is far from alone in his plight. Witness K and Bernard Collaery, who revealed Australia’s unlawful 2004 spy operation against Timor-Leste, are facing two years behind bars for their actions, and the Australian Taxation Office whistleblower, Richard Boyle, is facing a lengthy jail sentence for exposing aggressive debt collection tactics that were destroying the lives of vulnerable taxpayers.

In all three cases, the whistleblowers went through the appropriate steps to raise their concerns internally within government, before frustration at inaction led them into going public. They believed doing so would help afford them protections under Australia’s whistleblower regime.

“I made an internal complaint, I even went to the police first, I invoked whistleblower protections,” McBride told Guardian Australia.

“It’s all a sham.”

McBride said the inaction on his complaints led him to the ABC.

The lawyer says he was simply acting on his duty to report illegal conduct, and only wanted to protect Australia’s interest.

“I think it says everything about the problem today that if you describe my situation without saying my nationality, you would think we were talking about China or Russia,” McBride said.

“The idea that someone who basically suggested something was going wrong from within an organisation … is put in jail forever as a spy, that’s what totalitarian regimes do.

“There’s no suggestion that I’m actually damaging national security. I think the government is damaging national security, and yet they’re treating me as if I’m a terrorist.”

McBride’s comments again raise concerns about the ability of whistleblower protections to help those wanting to expose government wrongdoing.

In the case of Witness K and Collaery, the pair aired their concerns internally as required.

Witness K sought and obtained permission to talk to his lawyer, Collaery, about an illegal spy operation bugging Timor-Leste’s government during sensitive oil negotiations, raising his concerns through the inspector-general of intelligence and security.

Frustrated by the inaction, they contacted a series of journalists. Both are now facing two years behind bars for doing so.

Boyle, the ATO whistleblower, similarly made an internal disclosure under the Public Interest Disclosure (PID) Act to the ATO. His complaint was investigated and dismissed, according to the ABC and the Nine Entertainment newspapers. Boyle then went public.

“It says the government of Australia actually only cares about the government of Australia, and doesn’t actually care about Australia anymore,” McBride said.

“So if you speak out against the government, you’re a really bad person, even if you’re sticking up for the nation.”

“They’ve forgotten that they’re actually meant to work for the people of Australia.”

SAS Soldier McBride Leak is a Stand for Democracy

In the public interest.

A key quote:

Martin Luther King said “sometimes silence is the greatest betrayal of all’, or as General David Morrison put it “the standard you walk past is the standard you accept”.

A man after my own heart… there are many great men in the military.  I respect truth, honour and justice.  If you know of a crime stand for truth. End of story, literally.

Note: the process David took is a process many take as they are not answered, ignored and accountability absent. Then attempts are made to intimidate the press rather than the hard work of looking within.  Denial is not a river in Egypt.

The issue of disrespect is mentioned in the article, I note this attitude is across the board as values are not modelled as ‘who we are’ as a culture.  Democracy in my view is not just a word, it is who we are yet there are some in high places that consider accountability, transparency and freedom of speech an impediment rather than a value that drives to the heart of why we do what we do.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/my-duty-was-to-stand-and-be-counted-why-i-leaked-to-the-abc-20190608-p51vte.html

‘My duty was to stand and be counted’: Why I leaked to the ABC

Fifty-nine years ago today, my father, Dr William McBride, “discovered” that the drug thalidomide was causing birth defects. A relatively junior gynaecologist in his thirties with a young family, the long weekend gave him an opportunity to do the necessary thinking and draw the fateful conclusions.

As a former army officer who released classified documents to journalists, today I face a very different set of circumstances on a June long weekend. I will soon be facing trial in the ACT Supreme Court for charges relating to this act.

Dr William McBride with David, far left, and the rest of the McBride family in their Blakehurst home in 1972.

Dr William McBride with David, far left, and the rest of the McBride family in their Blakehurst home in 1972.CREDIT:ROBERT RICE/FAIRFAX MEDIA

Much as I would have liked it, my life has none of the fame and fortune of my father. He started at the bottom and reached the top, and I started at the top and may yet reach the very bottom. Yet despite outward appearances, I’m happy with where I’ve been, and where I’m going. My passion for using my brain to defend democracy and our hard won democratic freedoms is undiminished.

Having been sent to boarding school at a young age, I grew up on stories of WWII. My imagination was constantly filled with the deeds of those who sacrificed their lives for the freedoms we now take for granted. Subsequently, all I ever wanted to be was a soldier.

Even now I don’t consider myself an ex-soldier. My uniforms hang pristine waiting for the day they might be used again. But the essence of being an officer is not in the uniforms, or the medals. It’s in the funerals. The moment when you face a young man or woman who will face the rest of their life without their loved one. People accept death. It’s part of the job. What they can’t accept is waste. The question they want answered is consistent and valid: “Can you reassure me my beloved did not die for nothing.”

I take this responsibility seriously. It matters. A society that takes the lives of its most dedicated and idealistic youth recklessly or cynically is a society doomed to fail.

My time in the British Army taught me what leadership is, and what it isn’t. Its not about looking tougher than your soldiers, or giving them orders. They largely know what to do before you tell them, having spent their whole lives “in uniform”. There is one thing they rely on you to do: stand up and be counted when it matters. One job. But it’s a job that needs to be done, and only you can do.

I did two tours of Afghanistan for Australia. Each was hard in its own way, but equally they were also the best things I have done in my life. As an officer your responsibility remains the same, whether you are protecting soldiers from the Taliban or their own political masters. In 2013 my career reached a crisis point. It was my second deployment, this time as legal officer with the Special Forces, those who sacrifice most for our country. The point came where there was no doubt in my mind that a line had been crossed, and lives were being cynically wasted. My duty was to “stand and be counted” and I did. Whatever happens from now on is in many ways irrelevant. I did what I believe had to be done. My main enemy was not the chain of command, or even the police, rather myself.

The process of standing up took many years, and many forms. It started with a politely worded internal complaint. When that failed, I went first to the police, and then the minister. Finally I went to the press. Which brings us to my trial. The details probably matters less than the principle, namely, that I believed the Australian Defence Force had failed. Failed in its duty to its soldiers, failed in its duty to Australia. It’s a claim I stand by to this day.

Whistleblower David William McBride has been charged for leaking defence documents to journalists.

Whistleblower David William McBride has been charged for leaking defence documents to journalists.CREDIT:ALEXANDRA BACK

Whatever glossy ads we make, the life of those who defend our shores is a hard one. It is performed by hard people, and it needs to be. Death will always be part of the job. They accept that. What they can never accept is that those who they entrusted with their lives and the futures of their families, did not do “everything possible” to keep them alive or bring them home. Everything.

Soldiers need to die but the way we treat them says everything about who we are as a nation. A nation that treats its soldiers with disrespect is a nation in decline, but one that deserves to decline. I have no regrets about what I did, and I am ready to face the consequences as the justice system sees fit.

I am lucky in this regard in that Australia has possibly the most enviable legal “pedigree” in the world. Born of the ancient tradition of parliamentary democracy and “rule of law” whose beautiful, but painful evolution can be traced back through 800 years of the Magna Carta.

The rights and freedoms we enjoy are the product of idealism combined with suffering. In addition to the Anglo-Saxon tradition, we have undoubtedly inherited the almost timeless, wondrous spirit of the Indigenous people of this continent. While we are protected by these laws they also come with responsibilities. To the earth, and to each other. To ourselves.

A judge will decide my fate, and as a “true believer” in the rule of law, I willingly submit myself to that fate. How could I not, as it is the very same rule of law from which I claim my unenviable but inevitable duty. Whatever they decide, I believe that I did my duty.

David McBride is a former military lawyer and captain in Britain’s elite Special Air Service and the whistleblower at the centre of Australian Federal Police raids on the ABC’s Sydney headquarters on WednesdayHe was charged in September last year with theft of Commonwealth property, namely war crimes investigation files, and three counts of breaching the Defence Act. He was also charged under old secrecy provisions in the Commonwealth Crimes Act. He is due to face court on June 13.

Ex-CIA Susan Lindauer Whistle-blower on 9/11 and Iraq War

In the public interest.

Is the crime opposing terrorism (or other crimes)?

This video is of Susan Lindauer a former CIA whistle-blower.  This is her story.

Ex-CIA Lindauer Blows Whistle: 9/11, Iraq War

(note when I edit this post the video is visible.  When I save it, it returns to a link.  I cannot activate the link.  I suggest people place the link in the browser).